Available courses

Kurdology

دراسة تاريخ الشعب الكردي من النواحي السياسية والاجتماعية والاقتصادية 

 معرفة تاريخ اللغة الكردية واللهجات المتداولة ومقارنتها مع اللغات الاخرى 

 دراسة الحركة الثقافية الكردية من خلال دراسة بعض الشعراء ونتاجاتهم ودراسة اهم حركة ثقافية الا وهي جريدة كردستان 1889-1902 التي كانت بداية تطور حركة الوعي القومي الكردي .


General English I

This intensive course in general English provides an authoritative integrated syllabus, motivation topics, and cover the basic skills required in learning English. This course is specially adapted for the Middle Eastern students. The series of the book adopted has the following key features:

• Student’s Book with CD-ROM, Teacher’s Book, Workbook with/without key, Class Audio CDs, Workbook Audio CD, iTools 

• Clear focus on grammar 

• Balanced, integrated-skills syllabus 

• Real-world speaking skills - Everyday English, Spoken English, Music of English

General chemistry I

General chemistry courses typically introduce concepts such as stoichiometry, prediction of reaction products, thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, and many of the rudiments of physical chemistry.

Computer Skills I

   This course is an introduction to the basic skills for using the computer. It depends mainly on the syllabus of the ICDL program V.5 . This course will represent the first two models of the ICDL program .At the end of this course the students have the basic skills of using the computer and will be able of passing the first two ICDL models test.  


General Biology I

This is an introductory course in Biology is the study of life, individual organisms, their communities, and the systems, cells, and processes that make up living matter. Students of biology undertake a general program in which they study living organisms and the systems and processes that permit life

Academic Debate

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to: Collect information, analyze, criticize.

General English II

Understand the most common terminologies and vocabularies in computing

Read and write scientific paragraphs , articles and papers, more efficiently.

Use the internet search facilities more easier to find information he/she needs in English language.


Computer Skills II

Basic concepts of Information Technology , File management 

Human anatomy

Human Anatomy and Physiology is a laboratory-based course that investigates the structure and function of the human body. Topics covered will include the basic organization of the body and major body systems along with the impact of diseases on certain systems

have a lab data we can graph these data and get best curve for these points and find a function for this curve by using calculus.


Terminology

Medical terminology is the study of the principles of medical word building to help the student develop the extensive medical vocabulary used in health care occupations. Students receive a thorough grounding in basic medical terminology through a study of root words, prefixes and suffixes.

General chemistry II

General chemistry II courses typically introduce concepts such as stoichiometry, prediction of reaction products, thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, and many of the rudiments of physical chemistry

General Biology II

This is an introductory course in Biology is the study of life, individual organisms, their communities, and the systems, cells, and processes that make up living matter. Students of biology undertake a general program in which they study living organisms and the systems and processes that permit life

Histology

The subject will guide  Histology is a discipline which examines the structure and correlating functions of tissues and cells using light microscopy, electron microscopy and other specialized microscopic methods


Biochemistry I

  Biochemistry is the application of chemistry to the study of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. It emerged as a distinct discipline around the beginning of the 20th century when scientists combined chemistry, physiology, and biology to investigate the chemistry of living systems.


human physiology

  Biochemistry is the application of chemistry to the study of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. It emerged as a distinct discipline around the beginning of the 20th century when scientists combined chemistry, physiology, and biology to investigate the chemistry of living systems.


Parasitology

ParasitologyCourse Description The aim of the course is to develop basic knowledge and skill to identify the parasites,diagnose the diseases caused by them, manage the patients, prevent and control parasiticdiseases

Microbiology I

This course is an introduction to microbiology that provides a strong grounding in fundamental aspects of the basic biology of bacteria as well as a strong grounding in molecular biology and microbial genetics. Emphasis is placed on the study of infectious diseases of humans, other animals and plants

 

Lab instrumental

 Introduces students to the major concepts of instrumental analysis and to some of the instrumental techniques most commonly used in analytical and bioanalytical LABORATORY

Teacher: Himan Ali

Immunology

A study of the molecular and cellular interactions and principles of the immune system. Topics include immune system development, humoral & cell-mediated immunity, disease and treatments involving immunization, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity.

Biochemistry II

 This course will focus on metabolic biochemistry: the study of chemical reactions that provide the cell with the energy and raw materials necessary for life.

Hematology I

Hematology Theory and Lab includes a review of general cell morphology with an emphasis on hematopoiesis and bone marrow evaluation. Hematological disease states such as anemias and leukemias are discussed in detail. Hemostasis, thrombosis and disease of the coagulation system are discussed.

Parasitology II

 This course is a survey of animal parasites, using selected taxa to illustrate concepts and patterns of parasite/host evolution, systematics, physiology, morphology, life history, ecology and behavior.

Teacher: Israa Zangana

Microbiology II

The scope of microbiology, description of eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms, microbial nomenclature and classification.A general study of microorganisms, characteristics and nutrition.Growth, Reproduction of microorganisms. Genetics, Microbes and Disease, Microbes in food, Sewage and Industry, Control of microorganisms

Diagnosis Bacteriology

 This course is intended to provide the student with a foundation in medical microbiology. ... Describe the staining characteristics of bacteria and differentiate these ... Medical parasitology; An organ system approach to diagnostic microbiology

Molecular biology

Molecular biology is the study of biological systems at the molecular level. Molecular biology deals with nucleic acids and proteins and how these molecules interact within the cell to promote proper growth, division, and development. It is a large and ever-changing discipline

Hematology II

Introduces human hematological disorders associated with white cell abnormalities and anomalies. Emphasizes cell identification, cell differentiation and cell morphology evaluation procedures

Clinical Biochemistry I

Clinical Biochemistry is the division of laboratory medicine that deals with the measurement of chemicals (both natural and unnatural) in blood, urine and other body fluids. These test results are useful for detecting health problems, determining prognosis and guiding the therapy of a patient.

Histopathology I

Histopathology is the diagnosis and study of diseases of the tissues, and involves examining tissues and/or cells under a microscope.

Nutrition

Nutrition is the biochemical and physiological process by which an organism uses food to support its life. It provides organisms with nutrients, which can be metabolized to create energy and chemical structures. Failure to obtain sufficient nutrients causes


Biostatistic

Theory and application of basic statistical concepts for design of studies in health sciences, integrated with statistical software applications

Human Genetic

 The human genome sequence forms the cornerstone of contemporary human genetics. This course will cover hereditary and molecular genetics as it applies to humans, with a strong genomics and human disease perspective.

Teacher: Jiyan Haji

Medical Mycology

Medical Mycology focuses on pathogenic fungi and the diseases they cause in humans. Areas covered in this course include the fungi that cause the most devastating and common diseases, their mechanisms of pathogenesis, the clinical problems, and the host response (both in health and disease).

Virology

 A discussion of the principles of virology that will include an in depth look at the molecular and cellular events that occur during virus replication, the host cell response, and pathogenesis. Emphasis will be placed on animal viruses that impact human health and disease.

Clinical Biochemistry II

Clinical Chemistry 2 will provide an advanced knowledge of the metabolism and function of hormones and includes: the laboratory investigation of disorders of thyroid, pituitary, adrenal, hypothalamic, ovarian, testicular and renal hormones; and the use of tumour markers in oncology.

Histopathology II

Explain normal and abnormal human cell, tissue and organ structure;

Explain the basic protocols for fixing and staining organs and tissues for histological and cytological examination using light and electron microscopy;

Examine how certain diseases can be diagnosed using histological and cytological methods;

Describe protocols used for collecting, fixing and preparing cells for microscopic examination

Research project

A research project is a scientific endeavor to answer a research question. Research projects may include: • Case series • Case control study • Cohort study • Randomized, controlled trial • Survey • Secondary data analysis such as decision analysis, cost effectiveness analysis or meta-analysis.

Medical parasitology

Medical Parasitology is the branch of sciences dealing with parasites which infect humans, the diseases caused by them, clinical picture and the response produced by humans against them. It is also concerned with various methods of their diagnosis, treatment and their prevention & control .

Hematology and blood banking

Blood banking is the process that takes place in the lab to make sure that donated blood, or blood products, are safe before they are used in blood transfusions and other medical procedures. Blood banking includes typing the blood for transfusion and testing for infectious diseases.

medical biochemistry I

Medical Biochemistry is a branch of medicine that incorporates biochemistry and metabolism in human and disease. … Medical Biochemistry Journals directs diagnostics, clinical laboratories and treatment of patients with different biochemical and metabolically disorders.

Immunopathology

Immunopathology is the study of various diseases in which humoral (body fluid) and cellular immune factors play a role in causing pathological damage to cells, tissues, and the host. Defective or malfunctioning immune responses often lead to illness or disease.

Medical Ethics

Medical ethics is concerned with the obligations of the doctors and the hospital to the patient along with other health professionals and society. The health profession has a set of ethics, applicable to different groups of health professionals and health-care institutions.

Food Microbiology

Food microbiology is the study of the microorganisms that inhabit, create, or contaminate food. This includes the study of microorganisms causing food spoilage; pathogens that may cause disease; microbes

Teacher: Jaafar Ali

Research project

A research project is a scientific endeavor to answer a research question. Research projects may include: • Case series • Case control study • Cohort study • Randomized, controlled trial • Survey • Secondary data analysis such as decision analysis, cost effectiveness analysis or meta-analysis.

medical biochemistry II

Medical Biochemistry is a branch of medicine that incorporates biochemistry and metabolism in human and disease. ... Medical Biochemistry Journals directs diagnostics, clinical laboratories and treatment of patients with different biochemical and metabolically disorders.

Teacher: Kajeen Hassan

Molecular & Cellular Pathogenesis

he set of genetic and epigenetic incidents transmitted at birth could explain the hereditary aspects, the predisposition, and the endometriosis-associated changes in the endometrium, immunology, and placentation

Medical Bacteriology

Bacteriology: The science and study of bacteria and their relation to medicine and to other areas such as agriculture (e.g., farm animals) and industry. … Bacteriology is a part of microbiology which encompasses the study of bacteria, viruses, and all other sorts of microorganisms. Mar 29, 2021

Advance Histopathology

Histopathology is the diagnosis and study of diseases of the tissues, and involves examining tissues and/or cells under a microscope. Histopathologists are responsible for making tissue diagnoses and helping clinicians manage a patient's care.

General Biology I

This is an introductory course in Biology is the study of life, individual organisms, their communities, and the systems, cells, and processes that make up living matter. Students of biology undertake a general program in which they study living organisms and the systems and processes that permit life

Computer Skills I

   This course is an introduction to the basic skills for using the computer. It depends mainly on the syllabus of the ICDL program V.5 . This course will represent the first two models of the ICDL program .At the end of this course the students have the basic skills of using the computer and will be able of passing the first two ICDL models test.  



General chemistry I

General chemistry courses typically introduce concepts such as stoichiometry, prediction of reaction products, thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, and many of the rudiments of physical chemistry.

General English I

This intensive course in general English provides an authoritative integrated syllabus, motivation topics, and cover the basic skills required in learning English. This course is specially adapted for the Middle Eastern students. The series of the book adopted has the following key features:

• Student’s Book with CD-ROM, Teacher’s Book, Workbook with/without key, Class Audio CDs, Workbook Audio CD, iTools 

• Clear focus on grammar 

• Balanced, integrated-skills syllabus 

• Real-world speaking skills - Everyday English, Spoken English, Music of English


Kurdology

دراسة تاريخ الشعب الكردي من النواحي السياسية والاجتماعية والاقتصادية 

 معرفة تاريخ اللغة الكردية واللهجات المتداولة ومقارنتها مع اللغات الاخرى 

 دراسة الحركة الثقافية الكردية من خلال دراسة بعض الشعراء ونتاجاتهم ودراسة اهم حركة ثقافية الا وهي جريدة كردستان 1889-1902 التي كانت بداية تطور حركة الوعي القومي الكردي .



General Biology II / MMD

This is an introductory course in Biology is the study of life, individual organisms, their communities, and the systems, cells, and processes that make up living matter. Students of biology undertake a general program in which they study living organisms and the systems and processes that permit life

General chemistry II / MMD

General chemistry II courses typically introduce concepts such as stoichiometry, prediction of reaction products, thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, and many of the rudiments of physical chemistry

Terminology / MMD

Medical terminology is the study of the principles of medical word building to help the student develop the extensive medical vocabulary used in health care occupations. Students receive a thorough grounding in basic medical terminology through a study of root words, prefixes and suffixes.

Human anatomy

Human Anatomy and Physiology is a laboratory-based course that investigates the structure and function of the human body. Topics covered will include the basic organization of the body and major body systems along with the impact of diseases on certain systems

have a lab data we can graph these data and get best curve for these points and find a function for this curve by using calculus.



Computer Skills II / MMD

Basic concepts of Information Technology , File management 

General English II / MMD

Understand the most common terminologies and vocabularies in computing

Read and write scientific paragraphs , articles and papers, more efficiently.

Use the internet search facilities more easier to find information he/she needs in English language.



Academic Debate / MMD

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to: Collect information, analyze, criticize.

Instrumentation & Laboratory Techniques

lab instruments encompass a wide range of instrumentation whose principle purpose is to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze samples; the chemical makeup of a sample and the quantity of each component within a sample. The wide range of available equipment also allows for a wide range of testing methods and their respective applications.

Hematology

Hematology is the study of blood and blood disorders. Hematologists and hematopathologists are highly trained healthcare providers who specialize in diseases of the blood and blood components. These include blood and bone marrow cells.

Microbial Physiology

Microbial physiology can reasonably be defined as “structure–function relationships in microorganisms, especially how microbes respond to their environment”. Protection against nitrosative stress can be effective only if the required gene products are synthesised under physiologically relevant conditions.

General Microbiology

General Microbiology is an introductory unit that gives students an overview of microbes, particularly bacteria, as well as specific skills in handling and using microbial cultures.

Medical Virology

Virology is the study of viruses and virus-like agents, including, but not limited to, their taxonomy, disease-producing properties, cultivation, and genetics. Virology is often considered a part of microbiology or pathology.

General Parasitology I

Parasitology is the study of parasites, their hosts, and the relationship between them. A parasite is a living organism, which takes its nourishment and other needs from a host; the host is an organism which supports the parasite.

Quality Control Management

Quality control consists of inspection, measurement and testing to verify that the project outputs meet acceptance criteria defined during quality planning. It is focused on preventing problems being passed on to the internal or external customer.

Biochemistry

Biochemistry or biological chemistry is the study of chemical processes within and relating to living organisms. A sub-discipline of both chemistry and biology, biochemistry may be divided into three fields: structural biology, enzymology and metabolism.

Histology

Histology, also known as microscopic anatomy or microanatomy, is the branch of biology that studies the microscopic anatomy of biological tissues. Histology is the microscopic counterpart to gross anatomy, which looks at larger structures visible without a microscope.

Parasitology

Parasitology is the study of parasites, their hosts, and the relationship between them. As a biological discipline, the scope of parasitology is not determined by the organism or environment in question but by their way of life.

Teacher: Israa Zangana

Human Physiology

Human physiology is the science of how the human body functions in health and disease. A degree in human physiology provides excellent preparation for careers or graduate study in biomedical research and the health professions or related disciplines.

Medical Mycology

mycology, the study of fungi, a group that includes the mushrooms and yeasts. Many fungi are useful in medicine and industry. Mycological research has led to the development of such antibiotic drugs as penicillin, streptomycin, and tetracycline, as well as other drugs, including statins (cholesterol-lowering drugs).

Medical Bacteriology

Bacteriology is a branch of microbiology in which the focus of study is on bacteria and its effects on humans and the environment. As a microbiologist, you'll study organisms that are too small to be seen without a microscope, such as bacteria and viruses. Microbiologists deal with issues that touch on many aspects of our lives, including controlling the spread of infectious diseases, ensuring safe drinking water and maintaining a safe food supply. Medical bacteriology is concerned primarily with bacteria that cause disease and disease control.

General Biology I

This is an introductory course in Biology is the study of life, individual organisms, their communities, and the systems, cells, and processes that make up living matter. Students of biology undertake a general program in which they study living organisms and the systems and processes that permit life

Computer Skills I

   This course is an introduction to the basic skills for using the computer. It depends mainly on the syllabus of the ICDL program V.5 . This course will represent the first two models of the ICDL program .At the end of this course the students have the basic skills of using the computer and will be able of passing the first two ICDL models test.  



General chemistry I

General chemistry courses typically introduce concepts such as stoichiometry, prediction of reaction products, thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, and many of the rudiments of physical chemistry.

General English I

This intensive course in general English provides an authoritative integrated syllabus, motivation topics, and cover the basic skills required in learning English. This course is specially adapted for the Middle Eastern students. The series of the book adopted has the following key features:

• Student’s Book with CD-ROM, Teacher’s Book, Workbook with/without key, Class Audio CDs, Workbook Audio CD, iTools 

• Clear focus on grammar 

• Balanced, integrated-skills syllabus 

• Real-world speaking skills - Everyday English, Spoken English, Music of English


Kurdology

دراسة تاريخ الشعب الكردي من النواحي السياسية والاجتماعية والاقتصادية 

 معرفة تاريخ اللغة الكردية واللهجات المتداولة ومقارنتها مع اللغات الاخرى 

 دراسة الحركة الثقافية الكردية من خلال دراسة بعض الشعراء ونتاجاتهم ودراسة اهم حركة ثقافية الا وهي جريدة كردستان 1889-1902 التي كانت بداية تطور حركة الوعي القومي الكردي .



General Biology II / CBD

This is an introductory course in Biology is the study of life, individual organisms, their communities, and the systems, cells, and processes that make up living matter. Students of biology undertake a general program in which they study living organisms and the systems and processes that permit life

General chemistry II / CBD

General chemistry II courses typically introduce concepts such as stoichiometry, prediction of reaction products, thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, and many of the rudiments of physical chemistry

Terminology / CBD

Medical terminology is the study of the principles of medical word building to help the student develop the extensive medical vocabulary used in health care occupations. Students receive a thorough grounding in basic medical terminology through a study of root words, prefixes and suffixes.

Human anatomy

Human Anatomy and Physiology is a laboratory-based course that investigates the structure and function of the human body. Topics covered will include the basic organization of the body and major body systems along with the impact of diseases on certain systems

have a lab data we can graph these data and get best curve for these points and find a function for this curve by using calculus.



Computer Skills II / CBD

Basic concepts of Information Technology , File management 

General English II / CBD

Understand the most common terminologies and vocabularies in computing

Read and write scientific paragraphs , articles and papers, more efficiently.

Use the internet search facilities more easier to find information he/she needs in English language.



Academic Debate / CBD

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to: Collect information, analyze, criticize.

Instrumentation & Laboratory Techniques

lab instruments encompass a wide range of instrumentation whose principle purpose is to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze samples; the chemical makeup of a sample and the quantity of each component within a sample. The wide range of available equipment also allows for a wide range of testing methods and their respective applications.

General Microbiology

General Microbiology is an introductory unit that gives students an overview of microbes, particularly bacteria, as well as specific skills in handling and using microbial cultures.

General Histology

General Histology is the study of the tissues of the body and how these tissues are arranged to constitute organs.

Biochemistry

Biochemistry is the branch of science that explores the chemical processes within and related to living organisms. It is a laboratory based science that brings together biology and chemistry. By using chemical knowledge and techniques, biochemists can understand and solve biological problems.

Organic Chemistry

Organic chemistry is the study of the structure, properties, composition, reactions, and preparation of carbon-containing compounds. Most organic compounds contain carbon and hydrogen, but they may also include any number of other elements (e.g., nitrogen, oxygen, halogens, phosphorus, silicon, sulfur).

Analytical Chemistry

 Analytical chemistry is the science of obtaining, processing, and communicating information about the composition and structure of matter. In other words, it is the art and science of determining what matter is and how much of it exists.

Lab Management

Laboratory Management is responsible for providing advice and information to scientists on health and safety, particularly on how to carry out risk assessments and on appropriate control measures. A further major function of Laboratory Management is the overseeing of shared equipment servicing, replacement and the purchase of new equipment to facilitate the needs of researchers.

Nutrition

Nutrition is the biochemical and physiological process by which an organism uses food to support its life. It provides organisms with nutrients, which can be metabolized to create energy and chemical structures. Failure to obtain sufficient nutrients causes

Immunology

Immunology is a branch of medicine and biology that covers the medical study of immune systems in humans, animals, plants and sapient species. In such we can see there is a difference of human immunology and comparative immunology in veterinary medicine and animal biosciences.

Genetic

Genetics is the study of genes, genetic variation, and heredity in organisms. It is an important branch in biology because heredity is vital to organisms' evolution. Gregor Mendel, a Moravian Augustinian friar working in the 19th century in Brno, was the first to study genetics scientifically.

Teacher: Jiyan Haji

Human Physiology

Human physiology is the science of how the human body functions in health and disease. A degree in human physiology provides excellent preparation for careers or graduate study in biomedical research and the health professions or related disciplines.

Histology

Histology, also known as microscopic anatomy or microanatomy, is the branch of biology that studies the microscopic anatomy of biological tissues. Histology is the microscopic counterpart to gross anatomy, which looks at larger structures visible without a microscope.

Teacher: Layla Salih

Biochemistry

Biochemistry or biological chemistry is the study of chemical processes within and relating to living organisms. A sub-discipline of both chemistry and biology, biochemistry may be divided into three fields: structural biology, enzymology and metabolism.

General Biology I

This is an introductory course in Biology is the study of life, individual organisms, their communities, and the systems, cells, and processes that make up living matter. Students of biology undertake a general program in which they study living organisms and the systems and processes that permit life

Computer Skills I

   This course is an introduction to the basic skills for using the computer. It depends mainly on the syllabus of the ICDL program V.5 . This course will represent the first two models of the ICDL program .At the end of this course the students have the basic skills of using the computer and will be able of passing the first two ICDL models test.  



General chemistry I

General chemistry courses typically introduce concepts such as stoichiometry, prediction of reaction products, thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, and many of the rudiments of physical chemistry.

General English I

This intensive course in general English provides an authoritative integrated syllabus, motivation topics, and cover the basic skills required in learning English. This course is specially adapted for the Middle Eastern students. The series of the book adopted has the following key features:

• Student’s Book with CD-ROM, Teacher’s Book, Workbook with/without key, Class Audio CDs, Workbook Audio CD, iTools 

• Clear focus on grammar 

• Balanced, integrated-skills syllabus 

• Real-world speaking skills - Everyday English, Spoken English, Music of English


Kurdology

دراسة تاريخ الشعب الكردي من النواحي السياسية والاجتماعية والاقتصادية 
 معرفة تاريخ اللغة الكردية واللهجات المتداولة ومقارنتها مع اللغات الاخرى 


 دراسة الحركة الثقافية الكردية من خلال دراسة بعض الشعراء ونتاجاتهم ودراسة اهم حركة ثقافية الا وهي جريدة كردستان 1889-1902 التي كانت بداية تطور حركة الوعي القومي الكردي .



General Chemistry

General Chemistry is an introduction to the basic concepts of chemistry, including atomic structure and bonding, chemical reactions, and solutions. Other topics covered include gases, thermodynamics, kinetics and equilibrium, redox, and chemistry of the elements.

Anatomy

Anatomy is the branch of biology concerned with the study of the structure of organisms and their parts. Anatomy is a branch of natural science that deals with the structural organization of living things. It is an old science, having its beginnings in prehistoric times.

Kurdology

Kurdology is a subject designed for the first year students in different departments, it is a very important and interesting subject for Kurds and all of the other international students who would like to learn the history, culture, economical issues and the Folklore of Kurds. The term Kurdology is originated from the (Kurd + logy); the first part refers to the Kurdish nation while the second part refers to the science, acquaintance, knowledge, Introduction of Kurds as well as research, it means that this subject is designed to introduce the Kurdish nation to the world. This subject leads to investigating research about in the fields of (History, geography, language, culture, Kurdish literature, and Kurdish nation citizenship). The importance of this course appears through (history, geography, language, Art, literature, archaeology, bibliography) and many other areas related to the kurdish nation. In addition, this course will focus of different views of Western European scientists and researchers and Eastern Scientists (Including Muslim and Kurdish Scholars) about the Kurdish languages, dialects and cultures which are used throughout the history.

General English

General English is a loose term used to describe the type of English‏‎ required for everyday situations. It can be compared to more specific English teaching such as Business English‏‎, English for Academic Purposes‏‎ and so on.

Academic Debate

This course is designed to develop students’ abilities and skills in academic communication, argumentation and debate. The topics of this course train the Students to use sources for academic communication, to produce knowledge, to raise academic questions and to answer the questions scientifically. It also trains them to think critically, to respect others’ points of view and also to direct academic arguments. In this course, students are directed to raise questions and analyze the scientific texts logically and critically, i.e. they are guided to conduct a critical analysis of what they read and are provided with opportunities to practice and develop their skills by writing their reflections on the material studied and on their own learning. Moreover, they are assisted to Identifying problems academically and offer appropriate and scientific suggestions for solving such problems. Also, a number of lectures are devoted to teaching Health and Safety subject to train students about health awareness in order to use  laboratories, and protecting against diseases in cafeterias, libraries and lecture halls.

Furthermore, the course will focus on the importance of debate and time management. The aims of this course is to: 

  1. To foster critical thinking and thoughtful expression
  2. To appreciate the diversity of social relations in communities
  3. To develop intellectualism and confidence of expression.  At the end of the course, students will be able to:  1. Exercise debating skills and enhance abilities to express thoughtful, informed opinions in public settings.
  4. Use reliable sources to gather evidence in a responsive, critical way.
  5. Demonstrate skills of peaceful negotiation with others.
  6. Prepare and execute an argument that is logically ground and contributes to the good of the community.
  7. Identify emergent problems in communities and to see oneself as an active agent committed to the resolution of them.
  8. Demonstrate openness to diverse viewpoints and to express a willingness to change as a result.
  9. Demonstrate knowledge in learning communities using tools of technology for the common good. 

Laboratory Techniques

Laboratory techniques are the set of procedures used on natural sciences such as chemistry, biology, physics to conduct an experiment, all of them follow the scientific method; while some of them involve the use of complex laboratory equipment from laboratory glassware to electrical devices, and others require

Biochemistry

Biochemistry or biological chemistry is the study of chemical processes within and relating to living organisms. A sub-discipline of both chemistry and biology, biochemistry may be divided into three fields: structural biology, enzymology and metabolism.

Computer Skills I

   This course is an introduction to the basic skills for using the computer. It depends mainly on the syllabus of the ICDL program V.5 . This course will represent the first two models of the ICDL program .At the end of this course the students have the basic skills of using the computer and will be able of passing the first two ICDL models test.  




Academic Debate

This course is designed to develop students’ abilities and skills in academic communication, argumentation and debate. The topics of this course train the Students to use sources for academic communication, to produce knowledge, to raise academic questions and to answer the questions scientifically. It also trains them to think critically, to respect others’ points of view and also to direct academic arguments. In this course, students are directed to raise questions and analyze the scientific texts logically and critically, i.e. they are guided to conduct a critical analysis of what they read and are provided with opportunities to practice and develop their skills by writing their reflections on the material studied and on their own learning. Moreover, they are assisted to Identifying problems academically and offer appropriate and scientific suggestions for solving such problems. Also, a number of lectures are devoted to teaching Health and Safety subject to train students about health awareness in order to use  laboratories, and protecting against diseases in cafeterias, libraries and lecture halls.

Furthermore, the course will focus on the importance of debate and time management. The aims of this course is to: 

  1. To foster critical thinking and thoughtful expression
  2. To appreciate the diversity of social relations in communities
  3. To develop intellectualism and confidence of expression.  At the end of the course, students will be able to:  1. Exercise debating skills and enhance abilities to express thoughtful, informed opinions in public settings.
  4. Use reliable sources to gather evidence in a responsive, critical way.
  5. Demonstrate skills of peaceful negotiation with others.
  6. Prepare and execute an argument that is logically ground and contributes to the good of the community.
  7. Identify emergent problems in communities and to see oneself as an active agent committed to the resolution of them.
  8. Demonstrate openness to diverse viewpoints and to express a willingness to change as a result.
  9. Demonstrate knowledge in learning communities using tools of technology for the common good. 

Computer Skills I

Basic concepts of Information Technology, File management and personal computer.  The main objective of this course is to qualify the student to pass the ICDL exam in the second two modules covering Word processing and electronic spreadsheets using Microsoft Office 2007. The ICDL program has a well-defined set of objectives which include

  1. Promoting and encouraging computer literacy between students independent of their specialization
  2. Raise the level of knowledge about Information Technology and the level of competence in using personal computers and common computer applications for all students
  3. Ensure that all computer users understand best practices and the advantages of using a personal computer
  4. To increase the productivity of students and graduates who need to use computers in their specialization and work
  5. To enable better returns from investments in Information Technology (IT)
  6. To provide a basic qualification degree which will allow all students, regardless of their specialization to be part of the Information Society

Teacher: BILAL RASHEED

Kurdology I

Kurdology is a subject designed for the first year students in different departments, it is a very important and interesting subject for Kurds and all of the other international students who would like to learn the history, culture, economical issues and the Folklore of Kurds. The term Kurdology is originated from the (Kurd + logy); the first part refers to the Kurdish nation while the second part refers to the science, acquaintance, knowledge, Introduction of Kurds as well as research, it means that this subject is designed to introduce the Kurdish nation to the world. This subject leads to investigating research about in the fields of (History, geography, language, culture, Kurdish literature, and Kurdish nation citizenship). The importance of this course appears through (history, geography, language, Art, literature, archaeology, bibliography) and many other areas related to the kurdish nation. In addition, this course will focus of different views of Western European scientists and researchers and Eastern Scientists (Including Muslim and Kurdish Scholars) about the Kurdish languages, dialects and cultures which are used throughout the history.

General English I

  • This course develops basic listening, speaking, pronunciation and vocabulary acquisition for use in the classroom and daily life. The course is intended for beginners in English and for students with basic communication abilities.
  • Learner outcomes include improved ability to understand basic spoken English and to communicate in common situations by using basic language functions and the appropriate vocabulary with standard pronunciation.
  • Materials include a textbook for listening, speaking, and pronunciation and a picture dictionary.
  • Activities include both in-class and out-of-class listening and speaking tasks.This course develops basic reading, writing, vocabulary and grammar skills. The course is intended for beginners in English and for students with limited basic abilities in reading and writing.
  • Learner outcomes include improved ability to read and understand basic high frequency vocabulary and simple sentences, to write at the sentence and simple paragraph level with accurate spelling and punctuation and to understand and use accurately basic verb tenses and grammar.
  • Materials include a reading and vocabulary text and a grammar text.

Principles of Accounting I

Introduces financial accounting theory, including the accounting cycle, analysis and recording of transactions, and reporting financial information in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). This is the first term of the traditional accounting principles sequence. The course emphasizes the theoretical foundations of accounting and analytical skills needed by business and accounting students. Those with financial record-keeping responsibilities in their current employment will find it essential.  An understanding of accounting is necessary to examine the performance and financial health of business. For this reason, accounting is often referred to as the ‘language of business’. This course is the ideal way for students to acquire a valuable skill as well as begin to develop an appreciation of the role of accounting in the evaluation and management of a business. Accordingly, it is recommended as a course both for students interested in business generally, and for those planning a career in accounting. Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

  1.  Use debit and credit accounting to record and adjust basic business transactions.
  2. Prepare multi-step income statements, classified balance sheets, and statements of retained earnings.
  3. Use basic financial statement ratio analysis to evaluate financial performance.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of each step in the accounting cycle.
  5. Know and apply organizational internal control components.  
  6. Use Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) to record common business transactions involving merchandise inventory, cash, and accounts receivable transactions.

Teacher: diler ali

Principles of Statistics

This subject is designed to provide students majoring in management, accounting, economics and other fields of business administration with an introductory survey of the many applications of descriptive statistics

The definition of statistics given earlier referred to organizing, presenting and summarizing the data. When the students have completed this course, they will be able to:

  1. Organize, analyze, interpret and summarize the data in a useful and informative manner. 
  2. Calculate the central tendency and interpret the meaning and also applications of dispersion.
  3.  Measure the growth rate, in"nation or price ind# and real value.
  4. Understand, calculate and interpret the regression and correlation concept.
  5. Calculate and interpret the general trend in time series.

Principles of Management I

In this course, you will learn to recognize the characteristics of proper management by identifying what successful managers do and how they do it. Understanding how managers work is just as beneficial for the subordinate employee as it is for the manager. This course is designed to teach you the fundamentals of management as they are practiced today.

This course will illustrate how management evolves as firms grow in size. It is based upon the idea that the essential purpose of a business is to produce products and services in order to meet the needs and wants of the marketplace. A manager marshals an organization's resources (its people, finances, facilities, and equipment) toward this fundamental goal. In this course, you will explore the tasks that today's managers perform and delve into the key knowledge areas that managers need to master in order to run successful and profitable businesses.

Academic Debate /BA

This course is designed to develop students’ abilities and skills in academic communication, argumentation and debate. The topics of this course train the Students to use sources for academic communication, to produce knowledge, to raise academic questions and to answer the questions scientifically. It also trains them to think critically, to respect others’ points of view and also to direct academic arguments. In this course, students are directed to raise questions and analyze the scientific texts logically and critically, i.e. they are guided to conduct a critical analysis of what they read and are provided with opportunities to practice and develop their skills by writing their reflections on the material studied and on their own learning. Moreover, they are assisted to Identifying problems academically and offer appropriate and scientific suggestions for solving such problems. Also, a number of lectures are devoted to teaching Health and Safety subject to train students about health awareness in order to use  laboratories, and protecting against diseases in cafeterias, libraries and lecture halls.

Furthermore, the course will focus on the importance of debate and time management. The aims of this course is to: 

  1. To foster critical thinking and thoughtful expression
  2. To appreciate the diversity of social relations in communities
  3. To develop intellectualism and confidence of expression.  At the end of the course, students will be able to:  1. Exercise debating skills and enhance abilities to express thoughtful, informed opinions in public settings.
  4. Use reliable sources to gather evidence in a responsive, critical way.
  5. Demonstrate skills of peaceful negotiation with others.
  6. Prepare and execute an argument that is logically ground and contributes to the good of the community.
  7. Identify emergent problems in communities and to see oneself as an active agent committed to the resolution of them.
  8. Demonstrate openness to diverse viewpoints and to express a willingness to change as a result.
  9. Demonstrate knowledge in learning communities using tools of technology for the common good. 


Computer Skills II /BA

Basic concepts of Information Technology, File management and personal computer.  The main objective of this course is to qualify the student to pass the ICDL exam in the second two modules covering Word processing and electronic spreadsheets using Microsoft Office 2007. The ICDL program has a well-defined set of objectives which include

  1.  Promoting and encouraging computer literacy between students independent of their specialization
  2. Raise the level of knowledge about Information Technology and the level of competence in using personal computers and common computer applications for all students
  3. Ensure that all computer users understand best practices and the advantages of using a personal computer
  4.  To increase the productivity of students and graduates who need to use computers in their specialization and work
  5. To enable better returns from investments in Information Technology (IT)
  6. To provide a basic qualification degree which will allow all students, regardless of their specialization to be part of the Information Society

General English II /BA

  • This course develops listening, speaking, pronunciation and vocabulary acquisition for use in daily life and the classroom. The course is intended for high beginner students with basic communication abilities.
  • Learner outcomes include improved ability to understand basic spoken utterances and vocabulary and to communicate in common situations by using basic language functions and the appropriate vocabulary with standard pronunciation.
  • Materials include listening and speaking and pronunciation textbooks.
  • Activities include both in-class and out-of-class listening and speaking tasks which develop the students’ communication ability. This course develops reading, writing, vocabulary and grammar skills. The course is intended for high beginner students in English and for students with basic abilities in reading and writing.
  • Learner outcomes include improved ability to read and understand high frequency vocabulary and simple and more complex sentences, to write at the paragraph and short composition level with accurate spelling and punctuation and to understand and use accurately verb tenses, nouns/pronouns, and articles.

  • Materials include a reading and vocabulary text and a grammar text.

Microecnomics

The course provides an introduction to a core area of economics known as microeconomics. It considers the operation of a market economy and the problem of how best to allocate society's scarce resources. The course considers the way in which various decision making units in the economy (individuals and firms) make their consumption and production decisions and how these decisions are coordinated. It considers the laws of supply and demand, and introduces the theory of the firm, and its components, production and cost theories and models of market structure. The various causes of market failure are assessed, and consideration is given to public policies designed to correct this market failure.

Microeconomics is the study of how decisions are made by consumers and suppliers, how these decisions determine the allocation of scarce resources in the marketplace, and how public policy can influence market outcomes for better or worse. A basic understanding of microeconomics is essential to the study of macroeconomics because “micro” provides the foundations upon which “macro” is built. It is pointless to try to explain, for example, the demand for money and how it affects interest rates in the economy without a grasp of how suppliers and buyers interact in a market. The objective of this supplement to MACROECONOMICS: An Introduction, Third Edition is to provide a relatively compact overview of microeconomics for use in a course where micro is not a prerequisite for macro, and for students who want to brush up on their micro.

Economists think of there being two sides to a market, the demand side and the supply side. The demand side consists of economic agents, households and sometimes firms, who come to the market to buy a specific good or service. The supply side consists of the suppliers of the good or service, generally firms that produce the item. In markets for final goods, which are ready for consumption, the demanders are usually the consumers in the household sector; for example, someone buying a croissant. However, in the case of capital goods, it is a firm that is the buyer of the final good; for example, a bakery buying a new automated oven. There are also markets for intermediate goods where the buyers are firms purchasing a good or service used in the production of another good or service, for example bakeries purchasing flour from millers, or millers purchasing wheat from farmers.

We study the demand and supply sides of markets separately, because each involves different groups of agents. Within each group there is a common goal but the two groups have very distinct goals. Buyers all come to the market with the same goal of getting as much satisfaction, or what economists call utility, as they can from their limited budget. Suppliers are maximizing profit by using the factors of production - land, labour, capital, and entrepreneurship, - as effectively as possible, given the costs of those factors and the price at which they can sell their product.

Principles of Accounting II/BA

Introduces financial accounting theory, including the accounting cycle, analysis and recording of transactions, and reporting financial information in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). This is the first term of the traditional accounting principles sequence. The course emphasizes the theoretical foundations of accounting and analytical skills needed by business and accounting students. Those with financial record-keeping responsibilities in their current employment will find it essential.  An understanding of accounting is necessary to examine the performance and financial health of business. For this reason, accounting is often referred to as the ‘language of business’. This course is the ideal way for students to acquire a valuable skill as well as begin to develop an appreciation of the role of accounting in the evaluation and management of a business. Accordingly, it is recommended as a course both for students interested in business generally, and for those planning a career in accounting. Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

  1. Use debit and credit accounting to record and adjust basic business transactions.
  2. Prepare multi-step income statements, classified balance sheets, and statements of retained earnings.
  3. Use basic financial statement ratio analysis to evaluate financial performance.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of each step in the accounting cycle.
  5. Know and apply organizational internal control components.  
  6. Use Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) to record common business transactions involving merchandise inventory, cash, and accounts receivable transactions.

Applied Statistics

Statistics has two main branches, pure and applied statistics. This model belongs to the second one which concerns about collecting the data and analyzing data via some methods. Ideally, this text would be used in a one-semester course in financial models. A course in elementary statistics, the lectures are designed to be flexible enough to be used in a variety of possible courses in deferment areas such as in finance.

This course introduces students to classical formulas for finding variance, covariance and correlation and regression equation.  This subject is intended to:

The purpose of this module is training students how to calculate mean, variance, mod, median, covariance and correlation. In this course students distinguish between population and the sample of population, also they learn to verify the methods which are used to analyze the data such as finding the average of a sample or population. Furthermore the course consists of an introduction to methods of inferential statistics methods that help us decide whether the patterns we see in our data are strong enough to draw conclusions about the underlying population we are interested in.

Principles of Management II

In this course, you will learn to recognize the characteristics of proper management by identifying what successful managers do and how they do it. Understanding how managers work is just as beneficial for the subordinate employee as it is for the manager. This course is designed to teach you the fundamentals of management as they are practiced today.

This course will illustrate how management evolves as firms grow in size. It is based upon the idea that the essential purpose of a business is to produce products and services in order to meet the needs and wants of the marketplace. A manager marshals an organization's resources (its people, finances, facilities, and equipment) toward this fundamental goal. In this course, you will explore the tasks that today's managers perform and delve into the key knowledge areas that managers need to master in order to run successful and profitable businesses.

Commercial Law

This course is designed for students and consists of Introduction. Property law. Definition of Commercial law; Origins of Commercial Law. Definition and forms of obligation. Penalty, earnest payment, guarantee. Transfer of a personal right between creditors or debtors (cession, assignation, guarantee) Restitution, statute of limitations. Contract of sale. Lease agreement. Timeshare agreement, Agency agreement, Shipping agreement, Commission agreement, License agreement. Securities (Promissory note and cheque). 

Course Objectives: 

  1. Understanding basic principles and origins in the area of commercial law,
  2. Theoretical and practical preparation enabling students to acquire knowledge and skills related to commercial law. 

On successful completion of this course, student should be able to: 

  1.  define basic terms, values and laws in the area of commercial law,
  2. describe methods of applying principles and provisions of commercial law,
  3. compose simple contracts,
  4. asses the correctness of applying specific laws to a specific
  5. cases and choosing the most appropriate one

Macroeconomics

The field of economics is often broken down into two broad categories, which are: Macroeconomics and Microeconomics. Macroeconomics is a branch of economics that describes and explains economic processes and behavior of aggregates—income, employment, output, and so on—on a national scale. Throughout the history, the economy of any country went through four important phases considered as phases of the business cycles of the GDP (Gross Domestic Product). GDP as an important indicator in Macroeconomics is used to determine the value of all goods and services produced in the country and it examines the output growth of a country and how countries are getting better from a year to the next.

The subjects of the course are macroeconomic issues including the calculation of the real and nominal GDP, dealing with inflation and explaining some economic costs of inflation and causes of inflation (The demand-side effects and the supply-side effects). It also contains the unemployment in a country and explains the types of unemployment. GDP per capital is used in the course to make a comparison among countries to examine which country is better off. Recently, HDI (Human Development Index) indicator, which is developed by the UN, is used to calculating development of the countries since the indicator takes into accounts three important parts to examine the progressing of the countries which are: the health, education and wealth.

Two of the most important theories which can be studied throughout this course are the monetary and Macroeconomic theories that focus on some specific areas as follows:

  • The quantity theory of money.
  • Money and Inflation.
  • The velocity of circulation. This course is designed for students interested in understanding macroeconomic issues related to calculating the economic growth of countries and how countries are progressing. Since counties with higher GDP per capita can have higher standard of living and can afford better health care for their individuals and can also afford better education systems. The objective of the course is also to familiarize students with different types of unemployment since it has become a contemporary phenomenon in every corner in the world especially in our country.

Moreover, The course has been designed also to teach students the monetary policy tools that are the dominant forces in financial markets and always play a huge role in the macroeconomics to solve many economic problems including the inflation (a sustained increase in the general price level of all goods produced and services offered in an economy over a period of time).

The target clientele are students who enjoyed their macroeconomics class and would like more advanced course that will give them a way of thinking about contemporary economic issues. This course will be differentiated by its emphasis on both the theoretical and practical considerations that guide the making of monetary policy around the world. At the end of this course, students would be able to:

  1. Identify the main streams of economic thought from the past to the present and relate them to the ongoing debates about public policy and the role of the government in the economy.
  2. Use basic economic concepts and theoretical ideas when analyzing current economic problems and assessing the problems, prospects and possibilities for the economy.
  3. Recognize how fundamental economic institutions such as property rights, a well-developed legal system, and market incentives affect the functioning of the economy, how institutional arrangements such as households, businesses and governments affect the process of production and distribution of goods and services, and how particular government agencies, business establishments and global economic institutions operate and affect the economy and the lives of individuals.

Quantitative Methods

This course will cover operation research such linear programming problems, Graphical solution, Simplex method, Big-M method and optimal solution . Also it will cover some topics in some basic concepts in probability theory and operation research like Normal distribution, Bernoulli and Binomial distributions and Poisson distribution. This subject is intended to: The purpose of this module is training students how to calculate the maximum and minimum profit for whatever purpose and predict scenarios which will happen next to choose the right decision. At the end of this course and having completed the Essential reading and activities, you should be able to:

  • Introduction of linear programming problem.
  • Apply linear programming to find the solution.
  • Construct a model to represent system of equations.
  • Find the feasible solution of Graphical solution for two variables LPP.
  • Apply Graphical solution and solve two variables LPP.
  • Use Simplex method and application
  • Use Game Theory applications
  • Understand the basic concept of probability theory.
  • Use Normal and binomial distribution to analyze the Data.
  • Use Poisson distribution to find the average.

Logistic Management

The course has a great importance for the students in Business Administration department in which it aims to skill students in understanding and utilizing proper ways in transporting raw materials, goods, and services through the supply chain process from the point of gain to the point of consumption with minimum costs and in the determined time. This course will emphasize on declaring the concept of Logistics Management critically and will clearly explain the importance of studying logistics in nowadays complex and connected business world. The course is framed in a way that enable students to become successful logistical in the future. The basic aim behind teaching this course in Business Administration Department is to direct students toward better planning and implementing the different functions of logistics such as inventory, transportation, information flow, etc. in a proper way that as a total lead to a successful production system that assure competitive advantages for businesses.

Human Resources Management I

This course will provide an overview of human resources management (HRM). HRM is a fundamental component of the competitiveness, effectiveness, and sustainability of any organization, as it influences who is hired, how they are trained, evaluated, and compensated, and what steps are taken to retain them. Throughout the course we will focus on the role of managers and how they develop effective and efficient human resources practices that support the strategic goals of their organizations. To accomplish the above, activities will be infused into the curriculum that will familiarize students with the challenge of sustainability facing today’s companies that increases the role of human resource management practices.

The objectives of the course are:

  1.  To provide an understanding of key human resources practices in today's organizations. 
  2. To help build critical thinking skills by analyzing how human resources practices can support an organization's strategic objectives and enhance long-term performance. 
  3. To develop skills in the following areas: problem solving and analysis, written and oral communication, and teamwork.
  4. Apply the principles and techniques of human resource management gained through this course to the discussion of major personnel issues and the solution of typical case problems.


Intermediate Accounting I

  • Welcome to the both courses of Intermediate Accounting (I & II). These modules are main units for second year’s students because they require to understand clearly applicable and basic methods and models about accounting practices.
  • The lecturer will attempt to advance your expertise as far as possible. Also, the module seminars will arrange based on the students skills and will take into account their English language levels.
  • Nowadays, accounting plays a significant role and it is the dynamic position of global economy. This take place because it is defined as the language of business. The current Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and the Conceptual Framework for Financial Reporting (CFFR) are needed to develop and build students accounting skills. Therefore, the materials of this module will constructed on modern and professional sources of accounting concepts.
  • You can use calculator but your phone should be turned off. At the end of this course students are able to: ❋ Understand the conceptual framework for financial reporting.
  • Give details about the reasons for preparing adjusting entries.
  • Explain how to prepare financial statements and its purposes.
  • Recognize the types of intangible assets.
  • Outline and classify the different types of receivables.❋ Identify accounting problems linked to bank reconciliation.
  • Distinguish among perpetual and periodic inventory systems.
  • Describe the accounting issues associated with fixed assets.
  • Elucidate clearly accounting for equity.

Marketing Management I

Marketing Management is a course that examines the role and importance of marketing in the firm and other organizations. We will cover topics such as marketing plans/strategies, marketing research, market segmentation, retailing, advertising, pricing, Internet marketing, etc. You will find the course interesting and informative. Keep on top of the work. All the best.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

This course will help you to develop a better appreciation and understanding of the role of marketing in a business organization specifically, and in our society at large. 

Specific objectives include:

  1. To enhance your knowledge about marketing theories, principles, strategies and concepts and how they are applied;
  2. To provide you with opportunities to analyze marketing activities within the firm;
  3. To allow you to apply marketing concepts and theories to realistic marketing situations.
  4. MAJOR & CURRICULUM OBJECTIVES TARGETED
  5. At the end of this course, you should be able to:
  6. Recognize the importance of marketing in an organization, how marketing relates to other business functions, and the role of marketing in society at large.
  7. Do basic secondary research relative to marketing in an organization (e.g., by using Internet search engines, such as Yahoo, Google, etc.)
  8. Select, analyze and define a target market for a selected product or service.
  9. Develop a marketing plan or strategy for a product or service (e.g., company objectives, marketing objectives, target market(s), advertising, pricing, distribution, product/ service development, evaluation of competitors, contingency plans, budget, etc.)
  10. Evaluate/analyze the marketing strategy for an existing product and/or services. Know the basic marketing concepts and theories.

 The course will also enhance your achievement of the following curriculum objectives:

  • Written communication skills
  • Technology (computer) skills
  • Understanding of global issues in marketing/business
  • Critical thinking
  • Analytical skills
  • Appreciation of ethical issues in marketing/business

Business Correspondence

In our day to-day life we exchange our ideas, thoughts and other information with our friends, relatives and other people. Sometimes we directly talk to them and sometimes we also write letters to them. In letters we express our feelings in a few words, we may ask for any information or we may write about a complaint in connection with our problems. Similarly businessmen also exchange ideas, information by writing letters. They communicate business information to customers, suppliers and others and at the same time receive a variety of letters from them. In this lesson let us know about different types of letters used in the process of business transactions.

Communication through exchange of letters is known as correspondence. We communicate our feelings, thoughts etc. to our friends and relatives through letters that may be called personal correspondence. A Businessman also writes and receives letters in his day to-day transactions, which may be called business correspondence.

Business correspondence or business letter is a written communication between two parties. Businessmen may write letters to supplier of goods and also receive letters from the suppliers. Customers may write letters to businessmen seeking information about availability of goods, price, quality, sample etc. or place order for purchase of goods. Thus, business letters may be defined as a media or means through which views are expressed and ideas or information is communicated in writing in the process of business activities. After This course is intended to:

  • State the meaning of Business Correspondence;
  • explain the importance of Business Correspondence;
  • describe the essential qualities of a good business letter;
  • identify the various parts of a business letter; and
  • Recognize the different types of letters used in business.

Teacher: SHIVAN ALI

Operational Research

This course will cover operation research such linear programming problems, Graphical solution, Simplex method, the Sensitivity Analysis. Also it will cover some topics in some basic Transportation Problems, Apply Game theory and Decision-making, Definition, solution methods. This subject is intended to: The purpose of this module is training students how to calculate the maximum and minimum profit for whatever. Provide a range of theories and mathematical statistical methods in the subject of Operation Research and its applications in a different area of economic and Administration sciences and other scientific disciplines. Purpose and predict scenarios which will happen next to choose the right decision. At the end of this course and having completed the Essential reading and activities, you should be able to:

  • Introduction of linear programming problem.
  • Apply linear programming to find the solution.
  • Find the feasible solution of Graphical method for two variables L.P model.
  • Apply Graphical solution and solve two variables L.P model.
  • Use Simplex method and application .
  • Understand the Dual problem, Definition ,transfer primal model into dual model.
  • Understand the Sensitivity Analysis , Changes in the Right Hand Side (R.H.S).
  • Understand Transportation Problems, primal solution.
  • Apply Game theory and Decision-making, Definition, solution methods.

Teacher: SAAD ALNUAIMI

Organizational Theory

The course has a great importance for the students in Business Administration department in which it enable them to better understand the importance of understanding the nature of different organizations across different cultures to avoid conflicts and assure better performance.

This course will emphasize on declaring the concept of organizational Theories critically and will clearly explain the importance and the aim of studying the organization through different perspectives and how it develops through the time.

The course is framed in a way that enable students to become successful researchers, think out of the box and brain storm in the future. The basic aim behind teaching this course in Business Administration Department is to direct students toward a critical and out- of- box thinking through analyzing and understanding the managerial thought through different organizational phenomenon that enable them to connect this course outcomes with other managerial functions for better performance.

Human Resources Management II

This course will provide an overview of human resources management (HRM). HRM is a fundamental component of the competitiveness, effectiveness, and sustainability of any organization, as it influences who is hired, how they are trained, evaluated, and compensated, and what steps are taken to retain them. Throughout the course we will focus on the role of managers and how they develop effective and efficient human resources practices that support the strategic goals of their organizations. To accomplish the above, activities will be infused into the curriculum that will familiarize students with the challenge of sustainability facing today’s companies that increases the role of human resource management practices.

The objectives of the course are:

  1. To provide an understanding of key human resources practices in today's organizations. 
  2. To help build critical thinking skills by analyzing how human resources practices can support an organization's strategic objectives and enhance long-term performance. 
  3. To develop skills in the following areas: problem solving and analysis, written and oral communication, and teamwork.
  4. Apply the principles and techniques of human resource management gained through this course to the discussion of major personnel issues and the solution of typical case problems.


Teacher: omar waisy

Intermediate Accounting II

Welcome to the both courses of Intermediate Accounting (I & II). These modules are main units for second year’s students because they require to understand clearly applicable and basic methods and models about accounting practices.

  • The lecturer will attempt to advance your expertise as far as possible. Also, the module seminars will arrange based on the students skills and will take into account their English language levels.
  • Nowadays, accounting plays a significant role and it is the dynamic position of global economy. This take place because it is defined as the language of business. The current Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and the Conceptual Framework for Financial Reporting (CFFR) are needed to develop and build students accounting skills. Therefore, the materials of this module will constructed on modern and professional sources of accounting concepts.
  • You can use calculator but your phone should be turned off. At the end of this course students are able to: ❋ Understand the conceptual framework for financial reporting.
  • Give details about the reasons for preparing adjusting entries.
  • Explain how to prepare financial statements and its purposes.
  •  Recognize the types of intangible assets.
  • Outline and classify the different types of receivables.❋ Identify accounting problems linked to bank reconciliation.
  •  Distinguish among perpetual and periodic inventory systems.
  • Describe the accounting issues associated with fixed assets.
  • Elucidate clearly accounting for equity.

Teacher: diler ali

Marketing Management II

Marketing Management is a course that examines the role and importance of marketing in the firm and other organizations. We will cover topics such as marketing plans/strategies, marketing research, market segmentation, retailing, advertising, pricing, Internet marketing, etc. You will find the course interesting and informative. Keep on top of the work. All the best.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

This course will help you to develop a better appreciation and understanding of the role of marketing in a business organization specifically, and in our society at large. 

Specific objectives include:

  • To enhance your knowledge about marketing theories, principles, strategies and concepts and how they are applied;
  • To provide you with opportunities to analyze marketing activities within the firm;
  • To allow you to apply marketing concepts and theories to realistic marketing situations.
  • MAJOR & CURRICULUM OBJECTIVES TARGETED
  • At the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Recognize the importance of marketing in an organization, how marketing relates to other business functions, and the role of marketing in society at large.
  • Do basic secondary research relative to marketing in an organization (e.g., by using Internet search engines, such as Yahoo, Google, etc.)
  • Select, analyze and define a target market for a selected product or service.
  • Develop a marketing plan or strategy for a product or service (e.g., company objectives, marketing objectives, target market(s), advertising, pricing, distribution, product/ service development, evaluation of competitors, contingency plans, budget, etc.)
  • Evaluate/analyze the marketing strategy for an existing product and/or services. Know the basic marketing concepts and theories.


 The course will also enhance your achievement of the following curriculum objectives:

  • Written communication skills
  • Technology (computer) skills
  • Understanding of global issues in marketing/business
  • Critical thinking
  • Analytical skills
  • Appreciation of ethical issues in marketing/business

Research Method

The main purpose of the Research Methods, Data Analysis, and Reporting to introduce students to quantitative and qualitative methods for conducting meaningful inquiry and research. They will gain an overview of research intent and design, methodology and technique, format and presentation, and data management and analysis informed by commonly used statistical methods. The course will develop each student’s ability to use this knowledge to become more effective. These tasks include:

  • Developing a hypothesis, a research problem and related questions
  • Framing the problem with the correct research methodology
  • Collecting data that accurately addresses the research problem
  • Measuring the effectiveness of a program
  • Using data to make decisions
  • Providing technical guidance to contractors for inclusion in contract documents related to research projects
  • Evaluating feasibility of research proposals
  • Presenting data to support programs to decision makers and other consumers.

The course will provide an overview of the important concepts of research design, data collection, statistical and interpretative analysis, and final report presentation.

Each week students will work through lessons that present Finance & Banking -specific readings and research and/or statistics-related concepts that bring to life examples of how the weekly topic applies to Finance & Banking. This will allow students to clearly understand how the course material relates to their jobs as a banker. The main objective of this course is to give student good theoretical and practical research methods. The student will take courses introduce the nature methodology fundamental to conduct research in the banking and financial science field. More emphasis will be laid upon “survey method “to conduct quantitative research. A basic knowledge in statistical theories will be required to integrate and apply them to survey research methods. Emphasis will be on research design, questionnaire design, fieldwork procedure, data analysis and presentation of result including web publishing. This course therefor serves as training in the scientific method and its application to decision making.

Organizational Behavior

The course has a great importance for the students in Business Administration department in which it enable them to better understand the human behavior in different organizations across different cultures to avoid conflicts and assure better performance.

This course will emphasis on declaring the concept of organizational behavior critically and will clearly explain the importance and the aim of studying the human behavior in nowadays complex organizational environment.

The course is framed in a way that enable students to become successful HR officers in the future. The basic aim behind teaching this course in Business Administration Department is to direct students toward a critical and out- of- box thinking through analyzing and understanding human behavior through different organizational phenomenon that enable them to connect this course outcomes with other managerial functions for better performance. by the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Understand the meaning and importance of organizational behavior.
  2. prevent perceptual distortions and organizational conflicts.
  3. motivate employees in proper ways and maximize their performance.

Governmental Accounting

In this course students learn about accounting and reporting requirements used by government entities. The class focuses on the categorization of the major government fund types and the terminology associated with Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) and Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). this course is intended to: 

  • Define fund accounting terms and concepts.
  • Describe the budgetary process in government.
  • Identify the objectives of accounting and financial reporting in government and not-for-profit entities.
  • Apply governmental accounting procedures.
  • Apply accounting principles for various governmental funds.
  • Develop and analyze worksheets and financial reports related to governmental organizations. Upon completing this course,students will have an understanding of:
  • The characteristics and differences of the government environment that necessitate the unique accounting and financial reporting.
  • The process of setting accounting and financial reporting standards for government entities.
  • The bases of accounting and measurement focuses used by governments.
  • Fiscal accountability.
  • Exchange and no exchange transactions.
  • Budgeting in government.
  • Accounting and reporting in local governments, including: 
  • Determining the financial reporting entity.
  • Fund accounting and reporting.
  • Government wide accounting and reporting.
  • Accounting and reporting for specific transactions.


Production Management I

Production/operations management involves the integration of numerous activities and processes to produce products and services in a highly competitive global environment. Many

companies have experienced a decline in market share as a result of their inability to compete on the basis of product design, cost or quality. Most now agree that world class performance in operations, i.e., in product design, manufacturing, engineering and distribution, is essential for competitive success and long term survival. This course considers the operations from a managerial perspective. We will consider key performance measures of operations (productivity, quality and response time) as well as

important concepts for improving the performance of operation  along these dimensions. At the end of the course students will have a fair understanding of the role Production/Operations Management plays in business processes. Emphasis is given both to familiarization of various production processes

and service systems, and to quantitative analysis of problems arising in the management of operations.

Insurance Industry

The course covers the risks that are faced by an individual or firm and the various methods for their treatment. Methods of treatment include, but are not limited to, insurance, loss prevention, surety ship, simple retention, and self-insurance. Topics include personal and business insurance. This course is intended to:

  • define the nature of risk and identify the risks facing both individuals and organizations today;
  • describe the principles of risk management and the role of the risk manager;
  • outline the risks associated with loss of income, ownership of property, and legal liability;
  • classify the various types of insurance, which are used to reduce the chance of loss and identify other loss prevention/reductions mechanisms, which may be appropriate; and
  • explain our society's treatment of fundamental risks, the concepts of social insurance used to treat these risks, and surety ship. Learning activities of the course are: define different types of risks, hazards and perils, and explain the adverse effect of risk on economic activity
  • understand the basic statistical principles of insurance and identify the situations where insurance may be used as a risk-sharing or risk-transfer device
  • differentiate between private and social insurance and recognize the respective needs for each
  • understand the structure of the insurance industry and the unique facets of an insurance company, including its financial operations
  • describe the general principles of contract law with a particular emphasis on those principles that are peculiar to insurance
  • understand the traditional forms of whole life, endowment, and term insurance, as well as some of the innovative life policies, which are now available
  • describe the annuity contract and understand the various uses of annuities today
  • understand the need for disability income insurance and the provisions of the disability income policy
  • identify the various types and appropriate uses of medical expense insurance contracts
  • review the concept of the Social Security system, including the coverage it provides, the soundness of the program, and proposals for future changes
  • explain the Workers Compensation and Unemployment Compensation programs
  • understand the concept of estate planning and discuss the various tools, which are used to minimize estate shrinkage
  • understand the unique characteristics of group insurance and identify the types of group insurance most frequently used
  • understand the nature of pension plans and other retirement plans and outline the requirements for pension plans established under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA)
  • review the concept of property insurance with a particular emphasis on the various forms of Homeowners and Inland Marine insurance policies
  • discuss the legal concepts of negligence and identify methods of dealing with legal liability
  • understand the nature and need for automobile insurance, the types of automobile coverage, and a review of the computation of auto insurance costs
  • discuss commercial property and liability coverage available for businesses
  • understand the principles behind surety and fidelity bonding
  • recognize how government functions as an insurer
  • identify the need for regulation of the insurance industry, explain the methods by which the industry is currently regulated, and discuss proposals of future regulation
  • understand surety ship

Financial Management I

This resource is intended for new students and young leaders looking to learn about the fundamentals of financial management. Topics include planning and cash management, financial statements, cost cutting and financial analysis. Lessons include links to various resources, and users gain access to a list of recommended books related to financial management. While the resource does not offer assignments or tests, it does serve as a source of information for those looking to learn more about financial management. Financial management provides a foundation of the main topics in financial economics covering selected topics in corporate finance and asset pricing. In corporate finance we will be discussing capital budgeting, valuation, capital structure, and payout policy. In asset pricing, we will be studying the risk and return trade off, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, market efficiency, and derivative securities.

The course objectives are to provide a theoretical framework for considering corporate finance problems and issues and to apply these concepts in practice.

I have three primary goals for the course: 

  1. to give everybody the ability and confidence to tackle common financial problems in practice, 
  2. to give everybody a base level of financial knowledge that an MPA from a top business school should possess, and 
  3. to provide adequate preparation for future finance classes, especially the advanced corporate and investment classes at the Cihan School of Business.

Tourism Management

Tourism is recognized as one of the world’s biggest industries, accounting for nearly 10% of global GDP and one in every 10 jobs. Making tourism requires effective planning, marketing, human resources and financial management to succeed. As a manager in the multifaceted tourist sector, you will encounter many responsibilities.

Tourism Management Bachelor’s degree course put your studies into a wider perspective using knowledge from several disciplines. It focuses on how tourism industry is organized and developed, and how tourism influences society locally, nationally and globally.

The course has an international perspective, giving you practical and transferable skills in attraction management, communication and market research. The table covers a vast range of subjects from developing hotels to managing conference centers, maintaining a heritage site to planning events. The course allows you to build sector experience and management skills and gain a competitive edge in the graduate jobs market. Tourism Management is a study programme which prepares students to work in the dynamic tourism industry in sectors like hospitality, travel and tourism. The course will give you the knowledge and understanding how tourism businesses operate, how tourists behave and what impact tourism has on countries, cultures and the environment. It also helps to develop a wide range of skills that can be applied to a variety of managerial and entrepreneurial roles in the expanding tourism industry. The programme particularly emphasizes the cultural and political aspects of tourism, its special models in different societies and its impact on the regional and global economy. It also prepares students to plan a wide range of tourism activities and manage tourist products considering existing circumstances and conditions.

Our programme consists of 2 kinds of modules: compulsory modules and elective modules. Compulsory modules provide the fundamental knowledge and skills while elective modules allow to deepen the understanding of particular tourist-related phenomena and to develop personal interests and professional skills. To gain some more practical experience, students participate in workshops and tourist events.

Key issues and competencies:

  • Tour operating
  • Hotel management
  • Hotel marketing
  • Country and Regional marketing
  • Geo tourism & Ecotourism

Electronic Management

The course introduces students to common forms of electronic business and describes information technologies and web services that improve the productivity of a business.

Its content is designed to assist students in identifying and solving problems in connection with electronic business applications. The course includes examples of best practices and lessons learned to engage students, and help them construct knowledge.

The course covers:

  • the basics of electronic business,
  • forms of electronic commerce,
  • electronic data interchange,
  •  electronic payment systems,
  • electronic business options and opportunities, – electronic business security concerns, and
  •  legal and ethical issues.

The practical seminar assignment is focused on analysis of a concrete business problem and on selecting an electronic solution to that problem. Intended learning outcomes Knowledge and understanding of:

 basics of electronic business,

  • ways of communication and interchange of business data, information and documentation through electronic media,
  • selected information technologies and web services for different fields of electronic business. the course is intended to: - To make students acquainted with basic e-business domain concepts, and different forms and ways of electronic business through examples of good practices, and to present modern business challenges and technical aspects of electronic business.
  •  To get students equipped with basic skills of using contemporary information technologies and web services that support electronic business processes.

  • To develop students’ capabilities of applying the knowledge in creative solutions of concrete business problems by using information and communication technologies and web services.

Cost Accounting

Cost accounting provides key data to managers for planning and controlling, as well as data on costing products, services, and customers. By focusing on basic concepts, analyses, uses, and procedures instead of procedures alone, we recognize cost accounting as a managerial tool. The aim of the course is to equip students with skills and knowledge to:

Identify and calculate different types of costs (direct, indirect, variable, and fixed costs).

Distinguish between job-costing, process-costing, and joint-costing systems.

Determine the product cost by means of full- costing and direct-costing methods.

Determine the product cost by means of historical (actual) and standard cost systems. This course consists of a discussion of cost accounting concepts and objectives, an in-depth study of cost accounting systems and accumulation procedures and a search into the elements of material, labor and factory overhead costs. Students in this course will:

  • Describe how cost accounting is used for decision making and performance evaluation.
  • Explain the basic concept of cost and how costs are presented in financial statements.
  • Demonstrate how materials, labor and overhead costs are added to a product at each stage of the
  • production cycle.
  • Analyze the basic cost flow model and be able to assign costs in a job cost system.
  • Formulate overhead using predetermined rates and Activity-Based costing.
  • Asses how cost-volume-profit are related and use CVP analysis as a planning and decision making aid.
  • Prepare a budget and use budgets for performance evaluation after flexing the budget.
  • Interpret variable cost variances and fixed cost variances.
  • Summarize process cost accounting and prepare a process cost report.  

Teacher: diler ali

Production Management II

Production/operations management involves the integration of numerous activities and processes to produce products and services in a highly competitive global environment. Many

companies have experienced a decline in market share as a result of their inability to compete on the basis of product design, cost or quality. Most now agree that world class performance in operations, i.e., in product design, manufacturing, engineering and distribution, is essential for competitive success and long term survival. This course considers the operations from a managerial perspective. We will consider key performance measures of operations (productivity, quality and response time) as well as

important concepts for improving the performance of operation  along these dimensions. At the end of the course students will have a fair understanding of the role Production/Operations Management plays in business processes. Emphasis is given both to familiarization of various production processes

and service systems, and to quantitative analysis of problems arising in the management of operations.

Teacher: omar waisy

Risk and Insurance Management

The course covers the risks that are faced by an individual or firm and the various methods for their treatment. Methods of treatment include, but are not limited to, insurance, loss prevention, surety ship, simple retention, and self-insurance. Topics include personal and business insurance. This course is intended to:

  • define the nature of risk and identify the risks facing both individuals and organizations today;
  • describe the principles of risk management and the role of the risk manager;
  • outline the risks associated with loss of income, ownership of property, and legal liability;
  • classify the various types of insurance, which are used to reduce the chance of loss and identify other loss prevention/reductions mechanisms, which may be appropriate; and
  • explain our society's treatment of fundamental risks, the concepts of social insurance used to treat these risks, and surety ship. Learning activities of the course are: define different types of risks, hazards and perils, and explain the adverse effect of risk on economic activity
  • understand the basic statistical principles of insurance and identify the situations where insurance may be used as a risk-sharing or risk-transfer device
  • differentiate between private and social insurance and recognize the respective needs for each
  • understand the structure of the insurance industry and the unique facets of an insurance company, including its financial operations
  • describe the general principles of contract law with a particular emphasis on those principles that are peculiar to insurance
  • understand the traditional forms of whole life, endowment, and term insurance, as well as some of the innovative life policies, which are now available
  • describe the annuity contract and understand the various uses of annuities today
  • understand the need for disability income insurance and the provisions of the disability income policy
  • identify the various types and appropriate uses of medical expense insurance contracts
  • review the concept of the Social Security system, including the coverage it provides, the soundness of the program, and proposals for future changes
  • explain the Workers Compensation and Unemployment Compensation programs
  • understand the concept of estate planning and discuss the various tools, which are used to minimize estate shrinkage
  • understand the unique characteristics of group insurance and identify the types of group insurance most frequently used
  • understand the nature of pension plans and other retirement plans and outline the requirements for pension plans established under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA)
  • review the concept of property insurance with a particular emphasis on the various forms of Homeowners and Inland Marine insurance policies
  • discuss the legal concepts of negligence and identify methods of dealing with legal liability
  • understand the nature and need for automobile insurance, the types of automobile coverage, and a review of the computation of auto insurance costs
  • discuss commercial property and liability coverage available for businesses
  • understand the principles behind surety and fidelity bonding
  • recognize how government functions as an insurer
  • identify the need for regulation of the insurance industry, explain the methods by which the industry is currently regulated, and discuss proposals of future regulation
  • understand surety ship

Financial Management II

This resource is intended for new students and young leaders looking to learn about the fundamentals of financial management. Topics include planning and cash management, financial statements, cost cutting and financial analysis. Lessons include links to various resources, and users gain access to a list of recommended books related to financial management. While the resource does not offer assignments or tests, it does serve as a source of information for those looking to learn more about financial management. Financial management provides a foundation of the main topics in financial economics covering selected topics in corporate finance and asset pricing. In corporate finance we will be discussing capital budgeting, valuation, capital structure, and payout policy. In asset pricing, we will be studying the risk and return trade off, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, market efficiency, and derivative securities.

The course objectives are to provide a theoretical framework for considering corporate finance problems and issues and to apply these concepts in practice.

I have three primary goals for the course: (1) to give everybody the ability and confidence to tackle common financial problems in practice, (2) to give everybody a base level of financial knowledge that an MPA from a top business school should possess, and (3) to provide adequate preparation for future finance classes, especially the advanced corporate and investment classes at the Cihan School of Business.

Teacher: REVINK HAJI

Computer App. In Management

This course introduces the essential concepts necessary to make effective use of the computer and computer applications. Students will achieve an understanding of what a computer can do, how it works, and how it can be used to create documents using word processing and spreadsheet applications as well as presentation graphics for personal and business use.

The course will also equip students with the understanding of the internet and it’s infrastructure and how it’s application supports today’s competitive management environment. Students understanding of these issues and how they can use them to add value in business is critical in the course. Computer and office application use, systems analysis and

design, data modeling, and communication. Identify, analyze, and explain Information Technology solutions in

relation to costs, benefits, and risks. Develop and design applications in spreadsheet or database use. Develop the

analytical skills and understanding of computer systems, networks, and business software applications. Course outcomes :

  • a.Knowledge and Understanding: :

  1.  Understand the concept of data analysis
  2. Explain how data analysis help a business gain strategic advantages
  3.  Explain the purpose of Excel software packages for end-user productivity and collaborative computing
  4. Identify three business forecasting methods
  5. Explain how failures in IT management can be reduced by the involvement of business managers in IT planning and management. 

  •  b.Intellectual Skills: :

  1. Examine skills needed for effectiveness in the applying of data analysis
  2. Identify several strategic uses of Excel application and give examples of how they can help a business gain competitive advantages.
  3. Identify the business value of using Excel application in business forecasting
  4. To define and describe the functions of an operating system
  5. Professional and Practical Skills: :
  6. Explain why business forecasting is important for business professionals, and identify five areas of
  7. information systems knowledge that they need
  8. Explain how Excel application can help a business gain strategic advantages

  •  To describe the main uses of computer programming software, tools, and languages.
  • d.General and Transferable Skills: :

  1. The ability to practice team work and presents results.
  2. The ability to use Microsoft applications ( Access, Excel, PowerPoint, ,Publisher, and word)


Feasibility Study

This course develops a student’s ability to undertake complex feasibility studies. Students will learn these skills and techniques through performing various feasibility studies of differing size and complexity. A feasibility study is designed to establish whether a project or initiative is worth the investment in time and money needed to get it off the ground. Of course this includes the cost of developing the initiative, but it also looks at the availability of funding, both to initiate the project and to keep it going. However, the feasibility study also looks at the evidence of need, potential take up and constraints such as the capacity of buildings, staff and the community.The course also utilizes practical situations, using the analytical and assessment tools such as spreadsheets and Web Analysis, Critical Path, evaluation and review of programs.  This course has Overall objectives of the Decision:

  • Know the meaning of analysis and evaluation of projects. 
  • What are the links to the project.
  • Study stages throughout the project.
  • What information is needed to analyze the projects.
  • How to analyze the commercial viability of any project.
  • Analysis of the financial feasibility of new projects under certainty conditions. 
  • Analysis of the financial feasibility of new projects under uncertainty conditions.
  • Criteria for evaluating projects.  At the completion of the subject, students should be able to: 
  • Understand the principles of feasibility studies. 
  • Be able to complete a cash flow and financial forecast as part of the feasibility study process. 
  • Understand risk and be able to undertake a risk assessment. 
  • Understand the principles of an options appraisal. 
  • Conduct a Community consultation. 
  • Have the knowledge to provide a comprehensive funding analysis. 
  • Be able to calculate projected income through funding and trading.
  • Understand the factors both internal and external that impact on the feasibility of a project. 
  • Have the knowledge of the components of a feasibility study. 
  • Have a grasp of project costs, both direct costs and core costs. 
  • Be able to identify appropriate organizational structures and management structures which promote the feasibility of a project.

Banking Management

The Bank Management course explores the services that banks and their principal competitors (including savings and loans, credit unions, security and investment firms) offer in an increasingly competitive financial-services marketplace.  Bank Management discusses the major changes and events that are remaking banking and financial services today. Among the key events and unfolding trends covered in the text are: Newest Reforms in the Financial System, including the new Dodd-Frank Financial Reform Law and the Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility, and Disclosure (CARD) Act of 2009. Global Financial Sector coverage of the causes and impact of the latest “great recession.” Systemic Risk and the presentation of the challenges posed in the financial system.

Exploration of changing views on the “too big to fail” (TBTF) doctrine and how regulators may be forced to deal with TBTF in the future. Controlling Risk Exposure presentation of methods in an increasingly volatile economy.

Knowledge Management

Knowledge management (KM) is an area that has captured the attention of many organisations that are concerned with the ways knowledge is managed more effectively. This course focuses on how knowledge is created, captured, represented, stored and reused so as to fully leverage the intellectual assets of a firm. The tools and techniques for knowledge acquisition, assessment, evaluation, management, organization and dissemination are applied to business situations. Topics include knowledge generation, knowledge coordination and codification, knowledge transfer and reuse, technologies and knowledge management and knowledge management strategies. The goal is to enable you to learn about this practice in the context of managing the design, development and operation of information technologies that can facilitate KM.

The objectives of the course are:

  1. Analyze the role of knowledge management in attainment of financial objectives, quality and process improvement, and innovation. 
  2. Apply knowledge management models and technologies to business situations. 
  3. Use a knowledge management system for an organization. 
  4. Create a knowledge management plan to leverage opportunities to create, capture, represent and share knowledge within an organization.


Strategic Management

The course emphasizes the value and process of strategic management. In addition to familiarizing students with new subject matter, students are expected to integrate and

apply their prior learning to strategic decision making in organisations. The Strategic Management course is designed to explore an organisation’s vision, mission, examine

principles, techniques and models of organisational and environmental analysis, discuss the theory and practice of strategy formulation and implementation such as corporate

governance and business ethics for the development of effective  strategic leadership. The course is designed specifically not only to introduce students with key strategy concepts but also aims to help students to integrate and apply their prior learning to various business situations. The course aims to support MSc. programme objectives with solid grounding in ethics, globalization and cross-functional issues. On completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Understand the strategic decisions that organisations make and have an ability to engage in strategic planning.
  2. Explain the basic concepts, principles and practices associated with strategy formulation and implementation.
  3.  Integrate and apply knowledge gained in basic courses to the formulation and implementation of strategy from holistic and multi-functional perspectives.
  4. Analyze and evaluate critically real life company situations and develop creative solutions, using a strategic management perspective.
  5. Conduct and present a credible business analysis in a team setting.
  6. Understand the crucially important role that the HRM function plays in the setting and implementation of an organisation’s strategy

Entrepreneurship

Welcome to Entrepreneurship! This course s an introductory course intended to provide students with knowledge of entrepreneurship and the vital role played by entrepreneurs in the global economy. To achieve this, this course focuses on the creation of new ventures, the skills necessary for success in an entrepreneurial venture, and factors associated with new venture success.

Entrepreneurship is interdisciplinary so this paper provides students with the opportunity to draw together elements of other papers such as finance, economics, management, marketing,

production and so forth, showing how these must fit together to create a whole organization, rather than viewing these as a series of unrelated components. This paper also mixes theory

with practice. Students will be challenged to apply principles, concepts and frameworks to real world situations, particularly on assignments including the business plan and on exams.

This subject will help students determine if they want to start their own ventures or if they prefer to operate as corporate entrepreneurs working within an existing organization. Companies increasingly want and need employees who can identify problems and opportunities, exercise initiative and develop creative solutions, and build support while implementing their ideas. The concepts and skills emphasized in this paper should be useful whether starting a new business or innovating within an existing organization. Upon successful completion of this course, you should be able to:

  • Understand the context, concepts, theories and process of entrepreneurship
  • Develop entrepreneurial opportunities & recognize the entrepreneurial potential within yourself, whether you want to start your own business or act as an entrepreneur within an existing organisation
  •  Identify entrepreneurial opportunities and assess these opportunities
  • Research and determine the viability or feasibility of new business concepts
  • Understand how to turn a new business concept into a sustainable business venture
  • Appreciate that there are various types of entrepreneurs, such as social entrepreneurs, sustainable entrepreneurs, and entrepreneurial families

Managerial Accounting

  • Introduction to managerial accounting.
  • Cost – Volume - Profit analysis.
  • Short term decisions and relevant costs.
  • Budgets: operating and Financial Budgets.
  • Long term investment decisions.
  • Responsibility accounting. 

Students will be able to

Studying managerial accounting is one of the best investment students can make. Why? Because success in any organization- from the smallest corner to the largest multinational corporation – requires the use of accounting concepts and practices to provide information. Managerial accounting provides key data to managers for planning and controlling, as well as costing products, services and customers and how accounting information help managers make better decision, making teams instead just data providers. By focusing on the basic concepts, analyses, uses and procedures, we recognize accounting information as managerial tool for business strategies and implementation.

We also prepare students for the rewards and challenges facing them in the professional managerial accounting word both today and tomorrow.. To review the purpose, structure and operation of national and international economic institutions. By the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Understand to introduction of managerial accounting.
  2.  Definition of managerial accounting- objective of managerial accounting.
  3. Explain classified costs.
  4. Component cost of manufacturing company.
  5. Understand the break even point analysis.
  6. Compute the methods of break-even point. ,
  7. Explain margin of safety.
  8. Incremental analysis.
  9. Understand Budget and how prepared of operation budget.
  10.  Responsibility accounting.

Teacher: shamal obaid

Management Info. System

This course helps students see the connection between information systems (IS) and business performance. The use of information and communication technologies (ICT) by individuals and organisations dominates the business world. There is a fundamental change going on in the way that organisations run businesses and interact with each other. New types of infrastructure and applications are developed and utilized such as ERP (enterprise resource planning), IOS (inter-organisational systems), RFID (radio frequency identification), CRM (customer relationship management),This course is designed to introduce students to

  1.  IT management practices (e.g., intelligent supply chain management, IT in business process management, etc.),
  2. Data analyses in Microsoft Excel and Access,
  3. Enterprise resource planning in SAP.

This course provides students with an overview of the utilization of business application software and problem-solving using that software. Topics include computer systems, management information systems, microcomputer operating systems, word processing, electronic spreadsheets, database management, business graphics, networks, and integrated packages. Industry accepted microcomputer software will be used. This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of how Information Systems are used in organizations for meeting strategic and operational goals. To that end, students will acquire skills using current end-user

software for communication, data transformation, collaboration, and problem solving. The course also covers software and hardware components, information structures, basic business organization and processes, information system security, and networks. At the completion of the subject, students should be able to perform the following tasks:

  1. Explain basic concepts for IT/IS management
  2. Discuss organizational, business and strategic issues surrounding IT/IS, and
  3. Analyze and evaluate uses of strategic IT/IS in practice.

International Management

The International Management course focuses on opportunities and challenges created by globalization. It examines cross-cultural and management issues related to management in an international marketplace. The aim of this course is to enable students to better analyze and understand the opportunities and challenges that companies face when expanding their activities internationally and when dealing with international competitors in their home markets. Special attention is placed upon different tools and analytic competences available to the different specialized managerial roles when competing internationally.

The course is comprised of three segments. The first one is devoted to providing a better understanding of the international environment challenges. Focus is placed on the analysis of country differences in political economy and political risks as well as cultural and social heterogeneities. In this segment, the course covers the major facets of the international management environment (legal, political, economic, and cultural). The central debates surrounding the culture construct, formal and informal institutions, economic development, and regional integrations are presented in class, along with the major frameworks that have been used to describe these phenomena. Students are exposed to a diversity of ideas about cultural values in different nations, and how those values influence management and organizational practices. The readings build upon students’ existing knowledge of the functioning of American and Western European business organizations, and help them develop an understanding of how organizations function in a wide variety of cultures.

The second section of the course builds on the first section and analyses global organizational forms and international strategies. Its focus is on the strategic challenges confronting firms that compete in the global economy. It aims to develop understanding of how to gain competitive advantage and compete successfully in the international marketplace. In other words, its objective is to achieve an enhanced understanding of the most fundamental question in international strategic management: What determines the international success and failure of companies?

Finally, the third section deals with international management operations and covers an array of organizational issues such as human resource staffing and motivating a multicultural workforce, global marketing, design of global products and services, global R&D, and financing and accountability.

This is a core course in the ESCI-UPF International Business Program, a program that is designed primary for applicants who have a major or a minor in business. Generally, students pursuing any degree in Business Administration or Economics would not need any prerequisite. Applicants pursuing degrees in other areas should make sure they have taken Business Organization or an equivalent course. 


Project Management

This course provides a systematic and thorough introduction to all aspects of project management. Projects are an increasingly important aspect of modern business.

Therefore, the course underlines the importance of understanding the relation between projects and the strategic goals of the organisation. The course also discusses the technical, cultural, and interpersonal skills necessary to successfully manage projects from start to finish. It emphasises that project management is a professional discipline with its own tools, body of knowledge, and skills. Concepts are reinforced by case studies covering a wide variety of project types and industries.

This course provides students with insight on key aspects and challenges of Project Management (PM). Students will understand the importance of Project Management

across all avenues of work, from producing a Hollywood movie to constructing a skyscraper to upgrading IT systems. They will understand that PM skills are critical to most careers and that they can be applied at most businesses and professions.

This course will emphasize the tools that improves the student’s ability to plan, implement and manage projects during their entire life cycle, from scoping the project until its closure, including the methodologies of estimating time and costs for

completion and the measurement of progress and performance.

A special focus will be given on effective Leadership in typically quite heterogeneous teams, on Organisation and on Risk Management, defining success factors and those factors that contribute to time and cost overruns and potentially to the failure of a project. During this course numerous specific projects across different industries will be analysed for the students to understand the uniqueness of projects and of project management.  At the end of this course, students should be able to:

In terms of knowledge:

  • Understand the importance of PM in most industries and businesses and to apply specific tools, models and processes.
  • Understand the Importance of applying these methodologies and tools at the four distinct stages in the Project’s life cycle. The Definition, Planning, Execution and Closing Phase.
  • Understand the importance of Leadership specifically in heterogeneous and virtual teams as well as governance and approaches to conflict resolutions.
  • Understand key levers for measurement and follow up, Management Dash Board and Key Performance Indicators. ➢ Identify and Analyse factors for successful Projects, as well as reasons for failure based on specific case studies in the context of effective Risk Management.
  • Understand the structure of financial statements relating to Profit and Loss statement, Cash Flow Statement and Balance Sheet. Students should identify positive as well as warning signs within financial statements as indicators of issues for management to address.
  • Understand the importance of values and cultural differences, particularly in international projects. In terms of skills
  • Ability to do presentations on complex matters in a well structured and easy to understand way and with coherent and logic conclusions.
  •  Use appropriate referencing and bibliographic methods.
  • Demonstrate effective and integrative team-work.

In terms of attitudes, students should develop in this course:

  •  The students will learn to discuss complex management situations based on knowledge and facts and respect for different opinions
  •  critical attitudes, which are necessary for “life-long learning”
  •  an attitude of open-mindedness and self-critical reflection with a view to self improvement
  •  sensibility towards the ethical dimensions of different aspects of the content of this course
  • an open attitude towards inter-cultural team-work

Teacher: SHIVAN ALI

Research Method

The main purpose of the Research Methods, Data Analysis, and Reporting to introduce students to quantitative and qualitative methods for conducting meaningful inquiry and research. They will gain an overview of research intent and design, methodology and technique, format and presentation, and data management and analysis informed by commonly used statistical methods. The course will develop each student’s ability to use this knowledge to become more effective. These tasks include:

 Developing a hypothesis, a research problem and related questions

 Framing the problem with the correct research methodology

 Collecting data that accurately addresses the research problem

 Measuring the effectiveness of a program

 Using data to make decisions

 Providing technical guidance to contractors for inclusion in contract documents related to research projects

 Evaluating feasibility of research proposals

 Presenting data to support programs to decision makers and other consumers.

The course will provide an overview of the important concepts of research design, data collection, statistical and interpretative analysis, and final report presentation.

Each week students will work through lessons that present Finance & Banking -specific readings and research and/or statistics-related concepts that bring to life examples of how the weekly topic applies to Finance & Banking. This will allow students to clearly understand how the course material relates to their jobs as a banker. The main objective of this course is to give student good theoretical and practical research methods. The student will take courses introduce the nature methodology fundamental to conduct research in the banking and financial science field. More emphasis will be laid upon “survey method “to conduct quantitative research. A basic knowledge in statistical theories will be required to integrate and apply them to survey research methods. Emphasis will be on research design, questionnaire design, fieldwork procedure, data analysis and presentation of result including web publishing. This course therefor serves as training in the scientific method and its application to decision making.

Organizational Behaviour

The course has a great importance for the students in Business Administration department in which it enable them to better understand the human behavior in different organizations across different cultures to avoid conflicts and assure better performance.

This course will emphasis on declaring the concept of organizational behavior critically and will clearly explain the importance and the aim of studying the human behavior in nowadays complex organizational environment.

The course is framed in a way that enable students to become successful HR officers in the future. The basic aim behind teaching this course in Business Administration Department is to direct students toward a critical and out- of- box thinking through analyzing and understanding human behavior through different organizational phenomenon that enable them to connect this course outcomes with other managerial functions for better performance. by the end of this course, students should be able to:

- Understand the meaning and importance of organizational behavior.

- prevent perceptual distortions and organizational conflicts.

- motivate employees in proper ways and maximize their performance.

Governmental Accounting

In this course students learn about accounting and reporting requirements used by government entities. The class focuses on the categorization of the major government fund types and the terminology associated with Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) and Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). this course is intended to: Define fund accounting terms and concepts.

Describe the budgetary process in government.

Identify the objectives of accounting and financial reporting in government and not-for-profit entities.

Apply governmental accounting procedures.

Apply accounting principles for various governmental funds.

Develop and analyze worksheets and financial reports related to governmental organizations. Upon completing this course,students will have an understanding of:

The characteristics and differences of the government environment that necessitate the unique accounting and financial reporting.

The process of setting accounting and financial reporting standards for government entities.

The bases of accounting and measurement focuses used by governments.

Fiscal accountability.

Exchange and no exchange transactions.

Budgeting in government.

Accounting and reporting in local governments, including: 

Determining the financial reporting entity.

Fund accounting and reporting.

Government wide accounting and reporting.

Accounting and reporting for specific transactions.


Production Management I

Production/operations management involves the integration of numerous activities and processes to produce products and services in a highly competitive global environment. Many

companies have experienced a decline in market share as a result of their inability to compete on the basis of product design, cost or quality. Most now agree that world class performance in operations, i.e., in product design, manufacturing, engineering and distribution, is essential for competitive success and long term survival. This course considers the operations from a managerial perspective. We will consider key performance measures of operations (productivity, quality and response time) as well as

important concepts for improving the performance of operation  along these dimensions. At the end of the course students will have a fair understanding of the role Production/Operations Management plays in business processes. Emphasis is given both to familiarization of various production processes

and service systems, and to quantitative analysis of problems arising in the management of operations.

Insurance Industry

The course covers the risks that are faced by an individual or firm and the various methods for their treatment. Methods of treatment include, but are not limited to, insurance, loss prevention, suretyship, simple retention, and self-insurance. Topics include personal and business insurance. This course is intended to:

define the nature of risk and identify the risks facing both individuals and organizations today;

describe the principles of risk management and the role of the risk manager;

outline the risks associated with loss of income, ownership of property, and legal liability;

classify the various types of insurance, which are used to reduce the chance of loss and identify other loss prevention/reductions mechanisms, which may be appropriate; and

explain our society's treatment of fundamental risks, the concepts of social insurance used to treat these risks, and suretyship. Learning activities of the course are: define different types of risks, hazards and perils, and explain the adverse effect of risk on economic activity

understand the basic statistical principles of insurance and identify the situations where insurance may be used as a risk-sharing or risk-transfer device

differentiate between private and social insurance and recognize the respective needs for each

understand the structure of the insurance industry and the unique facets of an insurance company, including its financial operations

describe the general principles of contract law with a particular emphasis on those principles that are peculiar to insurance

understand the traditional forms of whole life, endowment, and term insurance, as well as some of the innovative life policies, which are now available

describe the annuity contract and understand the various uses of annuities today

understand the need for disability income insurance and the provisions of the disability income policy

identify the various types and appropriate uses of medical expense insurance contracts

review the concept of the Social Security system, including the coverage it provides, the soundness of the program, and proposals for future changes

explain the Workers Compensation and Unemployment Compensation programs

understand the concept of estate planning and discuss the various tools, which are used to minimize estate shrinkage

understand the unique characteristics of group insurance and identify the types of group insurance most frequently used

understand the nature of pension plans and other retirement plans and outline the requirements for pension plans established under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA)

review the concept of property insurance with a particular emphasis on the various forms of Homeowners and Inland Marine insurance policies

discuss the legal concepts of negligence and identify methods of dealing with legal liability

understand the nature and need for automobile insurance, the types of automobile coverage, and a review of the computation of auto insurance costs

discuss commercial property and liability coverages available for businesses

understand the principles behind surety and fidelity bonding

recognize how government functions as an insurer

identify the need for regulation of the insurance industry, explain the methods by which the industry is currently regulated, and discuss proposals of future regulation

understand suretyship

Financial Management I

This resource is intended for new students and young leaders looking to learn about the fundamentals of financial management. Topics include planning and cash management, financial statements, cost cutting and financial analysis. Lessons include links to various resources, and users gain access to a list of recommended books related to financial management. While the resource does not offer assignments or tests, it does serve as a source of information for those looking to learn more about financial management. Financial management provides a foundation of the main topics in financial economics covering selected topics in corporate finance and asset pricing. In corporate finance we will be discussing capital budgeting, valuation, capital structure, and payout policy. In asset pricing, we will be studying the risk and return trade off, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, market efficiency, and derivative securities.

The course objectives are to provide a theoretical framework for considering corporate finance problems and issues and to apply these concepts in practice.

I have three primary goals for the course: (1) to give everybody the ability and confidence to tackle common financial problems in practice, (2) to give everybody a base level of financial knowledge that an MPA from a top business school should possess, and (3) to provide adequate preparation for future finance classes, especially the advanced corporate and investment classes at the Cihan School of Business.

Computer App. In Management

This course introduces the essential concepts necessary to make effective use of the computer and computer applications. Students will achieve an understanding of what a computer can do, how it works, and how it can be used to create documents using word processing and spreadsheet applications as well as presentation graphics for personal and business use.

The course will also equip students with the understanding of the internet and it’s infrastructure and how it’s application supports today’s competitive management environment. Students understanding of these issues and how they can use them to add value in business is critical in the course. Computer and office application use, systems analysis and

design, data modeling, and communication. Identify, analyze, and explain Information Technology solutions in

relation to costs, benefits, and risks. Develop and design applications in spreadsheet or database use. Develop the

analytical skills and understanding of computer systems, networks, and business software applications. Course outcomes :

  • a.Knowledge and Understanding: :

  1.  Understand the concept of data analysis
  2. Explain how data analysis help a business gain strategic advantages
  3.  Explain the purpose of Excel software packages for end-user productivity and collaborative computing
  4. Identify three business forecasting methods
  5. Explain how failures in IT management can be reduced by the involvement of business managers in IT planning and management. 

  •  b.Intellectual Skills: :

  1. Examine skills needed for effectiveness in the applying of data analysis
  2. Identify several strategic uses of Excel application and give examples of how they can help a business gain competitive advantages.
  3. Identify the business value of using Excel application in business forecasting
  4. To define and describe the functions of an operating system
  5. Professional and Practical Skills: :
  6. Explain why business forecasting is important for business professionals, and identify five areas of
  7. information systems knowledge that they need
  8. Explain how Excel application can help a business gain strategic advantages

  •  To describe the main uses of computer programming software, tools, and languages.
  • d.General and Transferable Skills: :

  1. The ability to practice team work and presents results.
  2. The ability to use Microsoft applications ( Access, Excel, PowerPoint, ,Publisher, and word)



Kurdology

Kurdology is a subject designed for the first year students in different departments, it is a very important and interesting subject for Kurds and all of the other international students who would like to learn the history, culture, economical issues and the Folklore of Kurds. The term Kurdology is originated from the (Kurd + logy); the first part refers to the Kurdish nation while the second part refers to the science, acquaintance, knowledge, Introduction of Kurds as well as research, it means that this subject is designed to introduce the Kurdish nation to the world. This subject leads to investigating research about in the fields of (History, geography, language, culture, Kurdish literature, and Kurdish nation citizenship). The importance of this course appears through (history, geography, language, Art, literature, archaeology, bibliography) and many other areas related to the kurdish nation. In addition, this course will focus of different views of Western European scientists and researchers and Eastern Scientists (Including Muslim and Kurdish Scholars) about the Kurdish languages, dialects and cultures which are used throughout the history.

General English I

This course develops basic listening, speaking, pronunciation and vocabulary acquisition for use in the classroom and daily life. The course is intended for beginners in English and for students with basic communication abilities.

  • Learner outcomes include improved ability to understand basic spoken English and to communicate in common situations by using basic language functions and the appropriate vocabulary with standard pronunciation.
  • Materials include a textbook for listening, speaking, and pronunciation and a picture dictionary.
  • Activities include both in-class and out-of-class listening and speaking tasks.This course develops basic reading, writing, vocabulary and grammar skills. The course is intended for beginners in English and for students with limited basic abilities in reading and writing.
  • Learner outcomes include improved ability to read and understand basic high frequency vocabulary and simple sentences, to write at the sentence and simple paragraph level with accurate spelling and punctuation and to understand and use accurately basic verb tenses and grammar.
  • Materials include a reading and vocabulary text and a grammar text.

Computer Skills I

Basic concepts of Information Technology, File management and personal computer.  The main objective of this course is to qualify the student to pass the ICDL exam in the second two modules covering Word processing and electronic spreadsheets using Microsoft Office 2007. The ICDL program has a well-defined set of objectives which include

  1. Promoting and encouraging computer literacy between students independent of their specialization
  2. Raise the level of knowledge about Information Technology and the level of competence in using personal computers and common computer applications for all students
  3. Ensure that all computer users understand best practices and the advantages of using a personal computer
  4. To increase the productivity of students and graduates who need to use computers in their specialization and work
  5. To enable better returns from investments in Information Technology (IT)
  6. To provide a basic qualification degree which will allow all students, regardless of their specialization to be part of the Information Society

Principles of Statistics

This subject is designed to provide students majoring in management, accounting, economics and other fields of business administration with an introductory survey of the many applications of descriptive statistics

The definition of statistics given earlier referred to organizing, presenting and summarizing the data. When the students have completed this course, they will be able to:

  1. Organize, analyze, interpret and summarize the data in a useful and informative manner. 
  2. Calculate the central tendency and interpret the meaning and also applications of dispersion.
  3. Measure the growth rate, in"ation or price inde# and real value.
  4. Understand, calculate and interpret the regression and correlation concept.
  5. Calculate and interpret the general trend in time series.

Principles of Management I

In this course, you will learn to recognize the characteristics of proper management by identifying what successful managers do and how they do it. Understanding how managers work is just as beneficial for the subordinate employee as it is for the manager. This course is designed to teach you the fundamentals of management as they are practiced today.

This course will illustrate how management evolves as firms grow in size. It is based upon the idea that the essential purpose of a business is to produce products and services in order to meet the needs and wants of the marketplace. A manager marshals an organization's resources (its people, finances, facilities, and equipment) toward this fundamental goal. In this course, you will explore the tasks that today's managers perform and delve into the key knowledge areas that managers need to master in order to run successful and profitable businesses.

General English II

This course develops listening, speaking, pronunciation and vocabulary acquisition for use in daily life and the classroom. The course is intended for high beginner students with basic communication abilities.

Learner outcomes include improved ability to understand basic spoken utterances and vocabulary and to communicate in common situations by using basic language functions and the appropriate vocabulary with standard pronunciation.

Materials include listening and speaking and pronunciation textbooks.

Activities include both in-class and out-of-class listening and speaking tasks which develop the students’ communication ability. This course develops reading, writing, vocabulary and grammar skills. The course is intended for high beginner students in English and for students with basic abilities in reading and writing.

Learner outcomes include improved ability to read and understand high frequency vocabulary and simple and more complex sentences, to write at the paragraph and short composition level with accurate spelling and punctuation and to understand and use accurately verb tenses, nouns/pronouns, and articles.

Materials include a reading and vocabulary text and a grammar text.

Financial Statistics

This course teaches concepts such as Probability theory, probability distributions, inference with decision theory, regression models, index theory, models for time series and forecasting, volatility, options and management of data. Throughout the course you will learn and use statistical software packages.

The course forms part of the degree programme in business economics and is only open for program students. The concepts discussed in more detail are: probability theory/distributions, inference, (log)-regression

analysis, estimation of time series models and their use for forecasting, volatility, basics of options and data management using statistical software.

The course consists of one unit that is examined in two parts:

Exam 1: Financial statistics theory and applications, examination, written test; 6.0 ECTS

Exam 2: Financial statistics applications, home assignment in working groups; 1.5 ECTS

Note that each exam/test is graded separately and independently. This means that you, if you pass on one test, are not required to re-take the test should you fail the other. E.g. if you have passed the home assignment but fail to pass the final exam, you will retain the corresponding credits and will not be

required to do them again; you are only required to do those exams you have not passed.For a passing grade the student must demonstrate ability to:

  • identify, solve and interpret problems in financial statistics
  • carry out statistical analysis of financial data using statistical software 

Computer Skills II

Basic concepts of Information Technology, File management and personal computer.  The main objective of this course is to qualify the student to pass the ICDL exam in the second two modules covering Word processing and electronic spreadsheets using Microsoft Office 2007. The ICDL program has a well-defined set of objectives which include

  1. Promoting and encouraging computer literacy between students independent of their specialization
  2. Raise the level of knowledge about Information Technology and the level of competence in using personal computers and common computer applications for all students
  3. Ensure that all computer users understand best practices and the advantages of using a personal computer
  4. To increase the productivity of students and graduates who need to use computers in their specialization and work
  5. To enable better returns from investments in Information Technology (IT)
  6. To provide a basic qualification degree which will allow all students, regardless of their specialization to be part of the Information Society

Microeconomics

The course provides an introduction to a core area of economics known as microeconomics. It considers the operation of a market economy and the problem of how best to allocate society's scarce resources. The course considers the way in which various decision making units in the economy (individuals and firms) make their consumption and production decisions and how these decisions are coordinated. It considers the laws of supply and demand, and introduces the theory of the firm, and its components, production and cost theories and models of market structure. The various causes of market failure are assessed, and consideration is given to public policies designed to correct this market failure.

Microeconomics is the study of how decisions are made by consumers and suppliers, how these decisions determine the allocation of scarce resources in the marketplace, and how public policy can influence market outcomes for better or worse. A basic understanding of microeconomics is essential to the study of macroeconomics because “micro” provides the foundations upon which “macro” is built. It is pointless to try to explain, for example, the demand for money and how it affects interest rates in the economy without a grasp of how suppliers and buyers interact in a market. The objective of this supplement to MACROECONOMICS: An Introduction, Third Edition is to provide a relatively compact overview of microeconomics for use in a course where micro is not a prerequisite for macro, and for students who want to brush up on their micro.

Economists think of there being two sides to a market, the demand side and the supply side. The demand side consists of economic agents, households and sometimes firms, who come to the market to buy a specific good or service. The supply side consists of the suppliers of the good or service, generally firms that produce the item. In markets for final goods, which are ready for consumption, the demanders are usually the consumers in the household sector; for example, someone buying a croissant. However, in the case of capital goods, it is a firm that is the buyer of the final good; for example, a bakery buying a new automated oven. There are also markets for intermediate goods where the buyers are firms purchasing a good or service used in the production of another good or service, for example bakeries purchasing flour from millers, or millers purchasing wheat from farmers.

We study the demand and supply sides of markets separately, because each involves different groups of agents. Within each group there is a common goal but the two groups have very distinct goals. Buyers all come to the market with the same goal of getting as much satisfaction, or what economists call utility, as they can from their limited budget. Suppliers are maximizing profit by using the factors of production - land, labour, capital, and entrepreneurship, - as effectively as possible, given the costs of those factors and the price at which they can sell their product.

Principles of Accounting I

Introduces financial accounting theory, including the accounting cycle, analysis and recording of transactions, and reporting financial information in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). This is the first term of the traditional accounting principles sequence. The course emphasizes the theoretical foundations of accounting and analytical skills needed by business and accounting students. Those with financial record-keeping responsibilities in their current employment will find it essential.  An understanding of accounting is necessary to examine the performance and financial health of business. For this reason, accounting is often referred to as the ‘language of business’. This course is the ideal way for students to acquire a valuable skill as well as begin to develop an appreciation of the role of accounting in the evaluation and management of a business. Accordingly, it is recommended as a course both for students interested in business generally, and for those planning a career in accounting. Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

  1. Use debit and credit accounting to record and adjust basic business transactions.
  2. Prepare multi-step income statements, classified balance sheets, and statements of retained earnings.
  3. Use basic financial statement ratio analysis to evaluate financial performance.
  4.  Demonstrate knowledge of each step in the accounting cycle.
  5. Know and apply organizational internal control components.  
  6. Use Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) to record common business transactions involving merchandise inventory, cash, and accounts receivable transactions.

Intro. to Financial systems

An important component of modern economies is the financial system. Particularly since the 1980s, the “fictionalization” of the economies across the globe, with the unprecedented influence of capital markets and their intermediaries that this process has involved, has had increasingly visible effects on households and firms. Modern financial development, including innovations of financial instruments and institutions, has drastically increased the borrowing and savings opportunities of households and firms. However, there is also an increasing awareness that economies are now deeply interlinked and their performance is subject to greater volatility than in the past. 

The course enhances students' understanding of how financial markets operate, with an emphasis on their impact upon the economy. With the guidance of the instructor, students will explore the functioning of financial markets and how they shape behaviors, constraints and opportunities in key economic areas that households, firms, financial intermediaries and policy makers operate in. We attempt to provide a key contribution to students’ understanding of the role of finance and financial institutions and how they deliver positive economic outcomes in significant ways. The Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs) are what you should be able to demonstrate by the end of this course, if you participate fully in learning activities and successfully complete the assessment items. On successful completion of the course, you should be able to: 1. Demonstrate understanding of interconnections between finance and the economy. 2. Identify problems arising in the functioning of financial markets and intermediaries.3. Demonstrate understanding of how firms, households, financial intermediaries and policy makers interact to shape the interconnection between finance and the economy. 4. Provide arguments for a sound policy intervention that alleviates some of the problems arising from volatility of real and financial markets. 5. Evaluate the evolution of financial markets within mature economies. 6. Evaluate the costs of unregulated financial markets. 7. Construct economic arguments and written work which are logically and professionally presented. 8. Communicate ideas in a succinct and clear manner. 9. Evaluate the costs and benefits of working in teams. 10. Appreciate the real (economic and social) effects of financial markets and inter mediation in unregulated environments and participate in discussion on how best to achieve socially desirable outcomes from the interaction between finance and the economy. 11. Understand the cultural aspect of value creation in financial markets and how cultural factors may impact upon financial markets' volatility and vulnerability.

Principles of Management II

In this course, you will learn to recognize the characteristics of proper management by identifying what successful managers do and how they do it. Understanding how managers work is just as beneficial for the subordinate employee as it is for the manager. This course is designed to teach you the fundamentals of management as they are practiced today.

This course will illustrate how management evolves as firms grow in size. It is based upon the idea that the essential purpose of a business is to produce products and services in order to meet the needs and wants of the marketplace. A manager marshals an organization's resources (its people, finances, facilities, and equipment) toward this fundamental goal. In this course, you will explore the tasks that today's managers perform and delve into the key knowledge areas that managers need to master in order to run successful and profitable businesses.

English for Banking

English for Banking & Finance is part of the Vocational English series. It is designed for students in vocational education and for company employees in training at work. Written by industry practitioners, it combines a strong grammar syllabus with the specialist vocabulary and skills that learners need to succeed in their chosen field.

Level 1 English for Banking and Finance is designed for students with a basic knowledge of general English who now require an elementary (CEF level A1-A2) English course in this specific field. It includes:

topics that reflect the latest developments in banking and finance, making them immediately relevant to students’ needs;

clearly defined language and function objectives which are backed up by comprehensive on-the-page language boxes.

Banking Management

The Bank Management course explores the services that banks and their principal competitors (including savings and loans, credit unions, security and investment firms) offer in an increasingly competitive financial-services marketplace.  Bank Management discusses the major changes and events that are remaking banking and financial services today. Among the key events and unfolding trends covered in the text are: Newest Reforms in the Financial System, including the new Dodd-Frank Financial Reform Law and the Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility, and Disclosure (CARD) Act of 2009. Global Financial Sector coverage of the causes and impact of the latest “great recession.” Systemic Risk and the presentation of the challenges posed in the financial system.

Exploration of changing views on the “too big to fail” (TBTF) doctrine and how regulators may be forced to deal with TBTF in the future. Controlling Risk Exposure presentation of methods in an increasingly volatile economy.

Principles of Investment

Principle of Investments. This course will provide an introduction to the basic principles of investing. It will cover both theoretical and practical applications of portfolio management including concepts of risk, return, securities market function and the analysis of debt and equity securities. The students should have a good understanding of various financial instruments such as stocks, bonds, derivatives and mutual funds. (AACSB:

Disciplinary knowledge). The student should have considerable insight as to how these instruments are traded in financial markets and how they

can be used for different investment purposes. (AACSB: Disciplinary knowledge) 

  • The student should have a good
  • understanding of the concepts of risk,
  • return and diversification, and are expected
  • to be able to implement portfolio
  • optimization technique in making decisions
  • on capital and asset allocations.
  • The student should be able to analyze a
  • firm using the basic financial statements to
  • perform ratio analysis and be able to value
  • a firm using the appropriate dividend
  • discount model and the valuation ratios
  • such as P/E ratio
  • The student should understand the
  • concept of market efficiency and how to
  • make investment decisions based upon the
  • existence of market efficiency. (AACSB:
  • Disciplinary knowledge)


Principles of Accounting II

Introduces financial accounting theory, including the accounting cycle, analysis and recording of transactions, and reporting financial information in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). This is the first term of the traditional accounting principles sequence. The course emphasizes the theoretical foundations of accounting and analytical skills needed by business and accounting students. Those with financial record-keeping responsibilities in their current employment will find it essential.  An understanding of accounting is necessary to examine the performance and financial health of business. For this reason, accounting is often referred to as the ‘language of business’. This course is the ideal way for students to acquire a valuable skill as well as begin to develop an appreciation of the role of accounting in the evaluation and management of a business. Accordingly, it is recommended as a course both for students interested in business generally, and for those planning a career in accounting. Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

  1. Use debit and credit accounting to record and adjust basic business transactions.
  2. Prepare multi-step income statements, classified balance sheets, and statements of retained earnings.
  3. Use basic financial statement ratio analysis to evaluate financial performance.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of each step in the accounting cycle.
  5. Know and apply organizational internal control components.  
  6. Use Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) to record common business transactions involving merchandise inventory, cash, and accounts receivable transactions.

Financial Mathematics

This course builds a solid mathematics foundation for a capital markets career. You will learn different topics on applied math to help you understand many concepts of finance. This course covers topics such as simple and compound interest, future and present value, nominal and effective rates, annuity, DCF, and NPV. We will use Excel to demonstrate the calculation process and make sure you have practical skills to handle financial math problems. This course establishes the basics of the one-period model, shows how securities can be

represented by vectors and matrices, and introduces the concept of hedging. Further, the course introduces important financial notions such as returns, arbitrage and state prices, and gives examples of asset pricing both in complete and incomplete markets. Then, we introduce the multi-period binomial model for stock prices and compute a dynamic hedging strategy that replicates a given option. Finally, we take the binomial modeling from the discrete-time numerical explorations to the continuous-time complete market trail in Black-Scholes option pricing formula.

This course is about the active and practical use of mathematics, which includes

  • probability theory, 
  • linear algebra, 
  • calculus, 
  • partial differential equations, 
  • and stochastic

calculus, and numerical mathematics, with the main focus on three interrelated financial

topics: asset pricing, portfolio allocation, and hedge for the asset.

Public Finance

This course explores topics in the economics of government expenditures. We will study the rationales for government intervention in market economies, including the presence of asymmetric information in markets, externalities and public goods. Topics covered include: social insurance programs (health care, unemployment insurance and pensions and retirement savings incentives), policies that address positive and negative externalities and public goods. For each topic, we will (i) use insights from economic theory

to illustrate the rationale for government intervention and the trade-offs associated with specific policy interventions and (ii) discuss the empirical evidence on the effects of policy

interventions on consumers, firms and government finances.By the end of the course students should be able to:

  •  Describe the reasons why governments intervene in market economies
  •  Have a good understanding of the theoretical models and empirical techniques used in modern public economics
  • Be familiar with academic articles and reports (required readings) covered in the course
  • Be able to critique existing research, with the aim of identifying promising areas for future research (including your own research)


Commercial Law I / Banking

This course is designed for students and consists of Introduction. Property law. Definition of Commercial law; Origins of Commercial Law. Definition and forms of obligation. Penalty, earnest payment, guarantee. Transfer of a personal right between creditors or debtors (cession, assignation, guarantee) Restitution, statute of limitations. Contract of sale. Lease agreement. Timeshare agreement, Agency agreement, Shipping agreement, Commission agreement, License agreement. Securities (Promissory note and cheque). 

Course Objectives: •

  •  understanding basic principles and origins in the area of commercial law,
  • theoretical and practical preparation enabling students to acquire knowledge and skills related to commercial law. 
  • On successful completion of this
course, student should be able to: 

  •  define basic terms, values and laws in the area of commercial law,
  • describe methods of applying principles and provisions of commercial law,
  •  compose simple contracts,
  •  asses the correctness of applying specific laws to a specific cases and choosing the most appropriate one

Macroeconomics

The field of economics is often broken down into two broad categories, which are: Macroeconomics and Microeconomics. Macroeconomics is a branch of economics that describes and explains economic processes and behavior of aggregates—income, employment, output, and so on—on a national scale. Throughout the history, the economy of any country went through four important phases considered as phases of the business cycles of the GDP (Gross Domestic Product). GDP as an important indicator in Macroeconomics is used to determine the value of all goods and services produced in the country and it examines the output growth of a country and how countries are getting better from a year to the next.

The subjects of the course are macroeconomic issues including the calculation of the real and nominal GDP, dealing with inflation and explaining some economic costs of inflation and causes of inflation (The demand-side effects and the supply-side effects). It also contains the unemployment in a country and explains the types of unemployment. GDP per capital is used in the course to make a comparison among countries to examine which country is better off. Recently, HDI (Human Development Index) indicator, which is developed by the UN, is used to calculating development of the countries since the indicator takes into accounts three important parts to examine the progressing of the countries which are: the health, education and wealth.

Two of the most important theories which can be studied throughout this course are the monetary and Macroeconomic theories that focus on some specific areas as follows:

  • The quantity theory of money.
  • Money and Inflation.
  • The velocity of circulation. 

This course is designed for students interested in understanding macroeconomic issues related to calculating the economic growth of countries and how countries are progressing. Since counties with higher GDP per capita can have higher standard of living and can afford better health care for their individuals and can also afford better education systems. The objective of the course is also to familiarize students with different types of unemployment since it has become a contemporary phenomenon in every corner in the world especially in our country.

Moreover, The course has been designed also to teach students the monetary policy tools that are the dominant forces in financial markets and always play a huge role in the macroeconomics to solve many economic problems including the inflation (a sustained increase in the general price level of all goods produced and services offered in an economy over a period of time).

The target clientele are students who enjoyed their macroeconomics class and would like more advanced course that will give them a way of thinking about contemporary economic issues. This course will be differentiated by its emphasis on both the theoretical and practical considerations that guide the making of monetary policy around the world. At the end of this course, students would be able to:

  1. Identify the main streams of economic thought from the past to the present and relate them to the ongoing debates about public policy and the role of the government in the economy.
  2. Use basic economic concepts and theoretical ideas when analyzing current economic problems and assessing the problems, prospects and possibilities for the economy.
  3. Recognize how fundamental economic institutions such as property rights, a well-developed legal system, and market incentives affect the functioning of the economy, how institutional arrangements such as households, businesses and governments affect the process of production and distribution of goods and services, and how particular government agencies, business establishments and global economic institutions operate and affect the economy and the lives of individuals.

English for Banking II

English for Banking & Finance is part of the Vocational English series. It is designed for students in vocational education and for company employees in training at work. Written by industry practitioners, it combines a strong grammar syllabus with the specialist vocabulary and skills that learners need to succeed in their chosen field.

Level 1 English for Banking and Finance is designed for students with a basic knowledge of general English who now require an elementary (CEF level A1-A2) English course in this specific field. It includes:

topics that reflect the latest developments in banking and finance, making them immediately relevant to students’ needs;

clearly defined language and function objectives which are backed up by comprehensive on-the-page language boxes.

Commercial Law II / Banking

This course is designed for students and consists of Introduction. Property law. Definition of Commercial law; Origins of Commercial Law. Definition and forms of obligation. Penalty, earnest payment, guarantee. Transfer of a personal right between creditors or debtors (cession, assignation, guarantee) Restitution, statute of limitations. Contract of sale. Lease agreement. Timeshare agreement, Agency agreement, Shipping agreement, Commission agreement, License agreement. Securities (Promissory note and cheque). 

Course Objectives: 

  1.  understanding basic principles and origins in the area of commercial law,
  2.  theoretical and practical preparation enabling students to acquire knowledge and skills related to commercial law. 

On successful completion of this course, student should be able to: 

  • define basic terms, values and laws in the area of commercial law,
  • describe methods of applying principles and provisions of commercial law,
  •  compose simple contracts,
  • asses the correctness of applying specific laws to a specific cases and choosing the most appropriate one

Banking Marketing

This course explores the role of marketing and the change. For many years the primary focus of bank marketing was public relations. Then the focus shifted to advertising and sales promotion. That was followed by focusing on the development of a sales culture. Nowadays, banking sector all elements of the marketing concept – consumer satisfaction, profit integrated framework and social responsibility are all equally important. Therefore, The businesses that provide services understand that delivering value and customer satisfaction are key to ensuring their business survive and flourish.  It is argued that services now dominate marketing, whereas goods used to have the upper hand (domination). This course is designed for students interested in understanding specific features of banking and applying these features for attracting clients and promoting banking products. The objective of the course is also identifying current marketing position of a bank. Furthermore, it is designed to expand the knowledge by means of forming psychological and communicative competences. Finally, it introduces students to the foundations of financial marketing and current challenges for the bank in a competitive business environment, resulting into modifications of their marketing strategies since marketing plays an important role in financial markets. Throughout the completion of this course, students would be able to: 

  • Understand the economic and social significance of the financial services sector.
  •  Appreciate how recent thinking in marketing and services marketing applies to financial services. 
  •  Identify key issues for marketers of financial services. 
  • Appreciate the role of value in the marketing of financial services.
  •  Comprehend key pricing considerations in the marketing of financial services.
  • Generate and utilize the ideas of new banking products, location of new branches and attracting customers of different segments.     


Investment & Portfolio Management

The course presented examines the theoretical basis and practical approach to managing investment portfolios of financial assets. The course objective is to acquaint students with the theoretical foundation of modern portfolio theory, the major groups of investors and their investment objectives and constraints, and to learn how to employ practical skills in investment management, forming capital market expectations and forecasting markets activity to justify major investment portfolio management strategy for equity and fixed-income instruments.

A distinctive feature of the course is to focus on practical issues of managing the investment portfolio, ground on the results of recent academic research in the field of portfolio management. As a result of the course, students will know the basic theoretical foundations of portfolio theory, understand the investment process scope and stages, be able to form market expectations and build strategic asset allocation, select the optimal investment strategy. The objective of this course is to introduce the intuition and concepts of Investment analysis and portfolio management. Two broad decisions have been taken by any investors: allocation of the total investment in available

asset classes and how to select the assets within asset classes for investment. The decision of allocation and selection

of investment assets is based on the trade-off between risk and return, availability of the risk mitigating tools and

investment horizon with other parameters. The aim of the course is to provide the theoretical underpinning of the

subject with the implications in the real world. The course will help the participants in developing skills required to

conduct assessment of current issues covered by media and specialized journals.

Quantitative Methods

This course will cover operation research such linear programming problems, Graphical solution, Simplex method, Big-M method and optimal solution . Also it will cover some topics in some basic concepts in probability theory and operation research like Normal distribution, Bernoulli and Binomial distributions and Poisson distribution. This subject is intended to: The purpose of this module is training students how to calculate the maximum and minimum profit for whatever purpose and predict scenarios which will happen next to choose the right decision. At the end of this course and having completed the Essential reading and activities, you should be able to:

  1. Introduction of linear programming problem.
  2. Apply linear programming to find the solution.
  3. Construct a model to represent system of equations.
  4. Find the feasible solution of Graphical solution for two variables LPP.
  5. Apply Graphical solution and solve two variables LPP.
  6. Use Simplex method and application
  7. Use Game Theory applications
  8. Understand the basic concept of probability theory.
  9. Use Normal and binomial distribution to analyze the Data.
  10. Use Poisson distribution to find the average.

Credit Management

The main goal of this course is to develop a foundation of financial management concepts. This will enable the student to understand what credit risk management is, what the lending objectives are, and how to measure credit risk. The course also lays a foundation for more complex credit management topics that arise in additional elective courses in finance. This course in credit management also describes the credit rating systems.Topics and Lessons for Credit Management :

Lesson 1 Introduction to credit risk management

Lesson 2 The Credit Process

Lesson 3 Credit Selection

Lesson 4 Credit Risk

Lesson 5 Application of Credit Risk Measurement

Lesson 6 Objectives of Credit Portfolio

Lesson 7 Credit Risk Loss Distribution

Lesson 8 Credit Rating Systems

Lesson 9 The Economics of Credit

Lesson 10 The Basel Accords

Final Exams

Financial Risk Management

The course covers the risks that are faced by an individual or firm and the various methods for their treatment. Methods of treatment include, but are not limited to, insurance, loss prevention, surety ship, simple retention, and self-insurance. Topics include personal and business insurance. This couse is intended to:

define the nature of risk and identify the risks facing both individuals and organizations today;

describe the principles of risk management and the role of the risk manager;

outline the risks associated with loss of income, ownership of property, and legal liability;

classify the various types of insurance, which are used to reduce the chance of loss and identify other loss prevention/reductions mechanisms, which may be appropriate; and explain our society's treatment of fundamental risks, the concepts of social insurance used to treat these risks, and surety ship. Learning activities of the course are: define different types of risks, hazards and perils, and explain the adverse effect of risk on economic activity

understand the basic statistical principles of insurance and identify the situations where insurance may be used as a risk-sharing or risk-transfer device

differentiate between private and social insurance and recognize the respective needs for each

understand the structure of the insurance industry and the unique facets of an insurance company, including its financial operations

describe the general principles of contract law with a particular emphasis on those principles that are peculiar to insurance

understand the traditional forms of whole life, endowment, and term insurance, as well as some of the innovative life policies, which are now available

describe the annuity contract and understand the various uses of annuities today

understand the need for disability income insurance and the provisions of the disability income policy

identify the various types and appropriate uses of medical expense insurance contracts

review the concept of the Social Security system, including the coverage it provides, the soundness of the program, and proposals for future changes

explain the Workers Compensation and Unemployment Compensation programs

understand the concept of estate planning and discuss the various tools, which are used to minimize estate shrinkage

understand the unique characteristics of group insurance and identify the types of group insurance most frequently used

understand the nature of pension plans and other retirement plans and outline the requirements for pension plans established under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) review the concept of property insurance with a particular emphasis on the various forms of Homeowners and Inland Marine insurance policies discuss the legal concepts of negligence and identify methods of dealing with legal liability understand the nature and need for automobile insurance, the types of automobile coverage, and a review of the computation of auto insurance costs

discuss commercial property and liability coverage available for businesses understand the principles behind surety and fidelity bonding recognize how government functions as an insurer identify the need for regulation of the insurance industry, explain the methods by which the industry is currently regulated, and discuss proposals of future regulation understand surety ship

Commercial Banks

This course is designed to provide the students with tools and techniques to manage commercial banks. The content of the course included: performance evaluation of a bank, asset-liability management, management of various kinds of risks, such as interest rate risks, and also fund management and investment management. The class will examine management problems and policies of banks. The material to be covered will

include: balance sheet management (liquidity, liabilities, spread management, and investment management), capital adequacy, cost of funds, bank profitability, planning and management systems, and the regulatory environment.

Learning Objectives:

This course has the following specific learning objectives. After completing this course, you should be able to:

  1. Understand the basic problems of bank management.
  2. Analyze bank regulations and policies.
  3. Evaluate bank profitability and risk management.
  4. Examine the international bank environment, deposits, liquidity and capital. 

Management Information System

This course helps students see the connection between information systems (IS) and business performance. The use of information and communication technologies (ICT) by individuals and organisations dominates the business world. There is a fundamental change going on in the way that organisations run businesses and interact with each other. New types of infrastructure and applications are developed and utilized such as ERP (enterprise resource planning), IOS (inter-organisational systems), RFID (radio frequency identification), CRM (customer relationship management),This course is designed to introduce students to

  • IT management practices (e.g., intelligent supply chain management, IT in business process management, etc.),
  • Data analyses in Microsoft Excel and Access,
  • Enterprise resource planning in SAP.

This course provides students with an overview of the utilization of business application software and problem-solving using that software. Topics include computer systems, management information systems, microcomputer operating systems, word processing, electronic spreadsheets, database management, business graphics, networks, and integrated packages. Industry accepted microcomputer software will be used. This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of how Information Systems are used in organizations for meeting strategic and operational goals. To that end, students will acquire skills using current end-user

software for communication, data transformation, collaboration, and problem solving. The course also covers software and hardware components, information structures, basic business organization and processes, information system security, and networks. At the completion of the subject, students should be able to perform the following tasks:

  • Explain basic concepts for IT/IS management
  • Discuss organizational, business and strategic issues surrounding IT/IS, and
  • Analyze and evaluate uses of strategic IT/IS in practice.

Research Methods

The main purpose of the Research Methods, Data Analysis, and Reporting to introduce students to quantitative and qualitative methods for conducting meaningful inquiry and research. They will gain an overview of research intent and design, methodology and technique, format and presentation, and data management and analysis informed by commonly used statistical methods. The course will develop each student’s ability to use this knowledge to become more effective. These tasks include:

  • Developing a hypothesis, a research problem and related questions
  • Framing the problem with the correct research methodology
  • Collecting data that accurately addresses the research problem
  • Measuring the effectiveness of a program
  • Using data to make decisions
  • Providing technical guidance to contractors for inclusion in contract documents related to research projects
  • Evaluating feasibility of research proposals
  • Presenting data to support programs to decision makers and other consumers.

The course will provide an overview of the important concepts of research design, data collection, statistical and interpretative analysis, and final report presentation.

Each week students will work through lessons that present Finance & Banking -specific readings and research and/or statistics-related concepts that bring to life examples of how the weekly topic applies to Finance & Banking. This will allow students to clearly understand how the course material relates to their jobs as a banker. The main objective of this course is to give student good theoretical and practical research methods. The student will take courses introduce the nature methodology fundamental to conduct research in the banking and financial science field. More emphasis will be laid upon “survey method “to conduct quantitative research. A basic knowledge in statistical theories will be required to integrate and apply them to survey research methods. Emphasis will be on research design, questionnaire design, fieldwork procedure, data analysis and presentation of result including web publishing. This course therefor serves as training in the scientific method and its application to decision making.

Central Banks

Central banks are considered to be the most important players in financial markets throughout the world, which are the government authorities in charge of monetary policy. Central banks’ actions influences on interest rates, the amount of credit, and the money supply, all of which have direct impacts not only on financial markets, but also on aggregate output and inflation. To understand the role that central banks play in financial markets and the overall economy, we need to understand how these organizations work. Who controls central banks and determines their actions? What motivates their behavior? Who holds the reins of power? Throughout studying this course all of these questions can be answered profoundly.

The subjects of the course are monetary policy including the goals and tools of monetary policy, the choice of policy instruments, central bank credibility, arguments for and against central bank independence, and the interplay between the central bank and financial markets.

 The course looks specifically into the monetary policy process and the operation of the Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank, the regulation and supervision of the financial system, and the internationalization of financial markets.

Two of the most important theories which can be studied throughout this course are the monetary and Macroeconomic theories that focus on some specific areas as follows:

  • The demand for money
  •  The Keynesian Framework and the ISLM Model
  • Monetary and Fiscal Policy in the ISLM Model
  • Money and Inflation 

  This course is designed for students interested in understanding why Central Banks do what they do. Central banks are sometimes dominant forces in financial markets and always play a huge role in the macroeconomics. The target clientele are students who enjoyed their macroeconomics class and would like more advanced course that will give you a way of thinking about central banks. This course will be differentiated by its emphasis on both the theoretical and practical considerations that guide the making of monetary policy around the world.

Financial Management

This resource is intended for new students and young leaders looking to learn about the fundamentals of financial management. Topics include planning and cash management, financial statements, cost cutting and financial analysis. Lessons include links to various resources, and users gain access to a list of recommended books related to financial management. While the resource does not offer assignments or tests, it does serve as a source of information for those looking to learn more about financial management. Financial management provides a foundation of the main topics in financial economics covering selected topics in corporate finance and asset pricing. In corporate finance we will be discussing capital budgeting, valuation, capital structure, and payout policy. In asset pricing, we will be studying the risk and return trade off, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, market efficiency, and derivative securities.

The course objectives are to provide a theoretical framework for considering corporate finance problems and issues and to apply these concepts in practice.

I have three primary goals for the course: (1) to give everybody the ability and confidence to tackle common financial problems in practice, (2) to give everybody a base level of financial knowledge that an MPA from a top business school should possess, and (3) to provide adequate preparation for future finance classes, especially the advanced corporate and investment classes at the Cihan School of Business.